FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions

The questions below are the most popular questions we receive. If your question is not listed, please use our Contact Form or the Live Chat feature at the bottom of this page. Click on the category of interest to expand all FAQ’s related to that topic.

American V-Twin (3)

Original Question: Recently purchased a H-D TriGlide Ultra Classic, 2017 with the 107 vtwin. I saw your video where you put ohlin shocks on a tri glide, earlier model. Do you have a shop close to my location, Yonkers, New York 10701, or any shop nearest me that can put those shocks on my TriGlide?

 

ANSWER:
Please visit our Dealer Locator page for a Brock’s Dealer near you. That said, because we pre-set the spring rates and rebound dampening here at Brock’s Performance. Installation can be performed by the end user, or any competent service facility.

Currently they will not. The Night Rod steering neck is much longer than the FXR and Dyna the trees are designed to fit.

Yes, machining them out to 1/2″ will be fine.

BMW: S1000RR (2010-2017) (6)

Yes, you will have to remove the O2 sensors. If you are running the stock exhaust you don’t have to block the pair, but it will help with the decel popping if you do. We highly recommend you perform the pair valve block off if you are running one of our stainless steel systems. If you are running one of our titanium exhaust systems it is imperative that you block off the pair valve in order to prevent premature exhaust failure. Attached are the pair block off instructions.

Bolt stop to caliper, install wheel and axle and tighten to spec. The stop block just sits on top of swing arm so it will not spin. See pictures in attachments

Estimate 7-10, check out this link When dyno’s go wrong: Caught on Tape: When Dynos Go Wrong

Take a look at this link here. This link will answer all of your questions and more. It has articles, videos, dyno charts, you name it and it is all about the BMW S1000RR.

If you have the CT-Single exhaust (that mounts at rear footpeg) you can get the QuietKore muffler and/or the noise reduction plug.

If you have the CT Meg you can get the noise reduction plug as well, but there is no QuietKore CT Meg muffler. I am sorry we don’t do trade ins, your best bet would probably be to sell it on Ebay or Craig’s List, I imagine that it would sell rather quickly. If you have any other questions just give us a call at 937-912-0054.

We would recommend 0W20 for stop and go riding in traffic above 85 degrees, makes great power with superior protection when used with our Petron oil additive.

Brock's ECU Flash (3)

Original Question: 2016 Ducati Scrambler 803. I’m wondering if you guys have done an ECU reflash on a bike like this. I’m looking to get rid of certain maintenance related restrictions as well as engine performance restrictions, e.g. Speed limit. What is possible and what is recommended? I’m running stock air filter and modified (custom) exhaust.

ANSWER:
We have not made or tested any flashes for the Ducati models. I suggest contacting Guhl Motors he may have something available or maybe able to suggest someone for you.

If you are in the United States, once we receive your ECU it takes about 2 to 3 business days for the flash to be done then the ECU is shipped back to you. For international customers outside of the United States once we receive the ECU it takes about 4 to 6 business days then we would get the ECU shipped back to you.

Please make sure you place your order online for the specific flash you need before shipping the ECU to us.

Carbon fiber wheels have been around for some considerable time and have been proven to be safe when designed and manufactured properly and, as with any wheel, used within their design parameters. One of the parameters is the maximum static weight of the motorcycle for which the wheel is designed (BST sportbike wheels are designed for motorcycles that weigh up to 617 lb dry) and have more than adequate strength and damage tolerance for any usage within road/street, sport or race environment. Safety is dependent on more than just strength and stiffness. Due to improved handling and therefore lower driver fatigue and effort, BSTs make a positive contribution towards driver safety.

BST Carbon Fiber Wheels (37)

One of the good things about carbon fiber is that you can see damage immediately.

The first test is whether the tire is holding air. If it is not, the wheel is likely damaged beyond repair. Major damage will show cracks through the rim and the wheel will obviously not be usable.

If it holds air, remove the tire and check the wheel carefully. Damage can be superficial in which case minor cracks will be visible in the clear coat, and the wheel is usable. If the cracks are deeper and the layers of carbon fiber appear to be torn, this is more serious and the wheel should not be used.

Please feel free to send us photos to help assess the damage for you.

Because the Rotobox wheels come standard with anti-slip treatment applied to the front and rear wheels from the factory, we will quote them verbatim: Mount the tires using plenty of lubrication and inflate to 3 Bar/43 PSI – (MAX pressure 4 Bar/58 PSI), so the tire sits firmly in it’s place. The same procedure would be followed using BST wheels with anti-slip. Brock’s Performance stocks RuGlyde, an excellent tire mount lubricant – see link below.

Ru-Glyde Tire Mounting Lubricant – 8 oz Bottle
Excellent tire mounting lubricant from general street to the most powerful drag applications. Lubes then gets ‘tacky’

Wheels manufactured from metal are either cast, forged, machined, or manufactured as a combination of the three processes. Aluminum wheels have been around for many years. They are relatively easy to manufacture and also relatively cheap, but they are heavy because of the density to strength ratio of Aluminum (how much strength you can get for a kilogram of Aluminum). To improve the weight you can either choose a material that is lighter or one that is stronger, or one that is lighter and stronger. Using magnesium, which is lighter but not necessarily stronger, you can improve on weight slightly.

The problem with magnesium is twofold: first – its fatigue properties are poor and so are the corrosion properties, so a wheel may not last very long even if perfectly cast and machined. The second problem is worse – very often micro-porosity occurs during the casting process, which has a negative impact on both fatigue life and corrosion. So magnesium wheels can be nice and light but may not last very long, sometimes less than a racing season. This makes magnesium wheels good for racing but unattractive to the man in the street. The only solution is to find a material that is lighter, stronger, fatigue free and corrosion free – Carbon fiber. As an engineering material, carbon fiber is far superior to Magnesium or Aluminum alloys.

Check out the reviews/news articles posted on our webpage: http://blog.brocksperformance.com/bst-wheel-information-page/

While we understand that some of our customers have used Dynabeads, the long term effects of the ceramic beads against carbon fiber have not been thoroughly tested and may void the factory warranty. Please see the Blackstone TEK. (“BST”) Warranty Disclaimer for additional information: http://blog.brocksperformance.com/blackstone-tek-bst-warranty-disclaimer/

Yes you can. Make sure that the warmers and regulators are operating correctly. Do NOT use enclosed tire warmers (side covers that blanket the entire wheel) as this pushes the temperature higher than the specification given on the warmers and on the wheels. Carbon fiber wheels are designed to operate up to 176º F which is more than adequate and will work within the requirements of the tire warmer specifications. If used under normal circumstances, a tire warmer set at 194º F will warm the tire accordingly, and the wheel itself will not achieve more than 122-140º F. Carbon does not radiate the heat as quickly as metals, so there is no need to be overly-aggressive with the warmer settings.

BST wheels are made specifically for a type and model of bike. The manufacturing process ensures that the wheel runs absolutely true on its own hub which has a unique fastening system and may not be tampered with. You cannot change the hubs. Your best solution is to sell your wheels – either separately or as a value-add to your current motorcycle – and buy new BST wheels for your new bike. Update: BST has introduced a rear wheel with hub adapters to allow use on multiple makes/models – see www.BrocksPerformance.com for details.

We achieved TUV certification for the facility and for the wheels – GSXR1000 front and rears, Ducati 916-998 series and 748 front and rears. TUV requires certification per model. BST wheels passed every test. However TUV are currently writing new specifications for carbon wheels and all manufacturers will have to have their carbon wheels tested to the new specifications when this process has been completed.

Because all of the items you mention bolt directly to the OEM rotor (rear) or carriers (front), no hub modifications are required to the BST wheels.

This allows the use of all year ZX-14 wheels on the 2013. The same was true for the 2012, which carried the identical mechanical components for use with its KTRC system. The anti-lock braking addition is simply a software/firmware enhancement for 2013.

No. Please click here to view the Blackstone Tek. (“BST”) Warranty Disclaimer: http://blog.brocksperformance.com/blackstone-tek-bst-warranty-disclaimer/

We do have some suggestions if you encounter a road hazard, crash, damage or theft and it all boils down to PROPER DOCUMENTATION BEFOREHAND:

1. Pothole Damage – D.O.T. Claim by State: Most states have a fund set up specifically to address these types of issues. It’s an uphill battle to collect in most instances, but it is possible. Document pothole ASAP (immediately and safely before it is filled, etc…) Photograph and detail with as much info. as possible i.e. location, size, depth (show a tape measure in the hole,) etc.

See Related Link below for State of Ohio Example/More Info. Please Note: Your State procedure may differ.

2. Pothole/Road Hazard/Curb/Etc… – Insurance Claim: The job of insurance is to repair your vehicle to its previous condition ‘before the accident.’ If you carry a collision policy, companies like State Farm will usually consider striking a large pothole/curb (or other type of road hazard) a collision, and repair or replace your damaged wheels. The key is complete documentation. Keep all receipts showing purchase date, installation date, value, etc… Take photos and videos of your bike and wheels. Store them in a safe place (even send copies to your insurance agent.) Notify your insurance company of your modifications before you go for a ride. If you don’t give them any excuses, the process can be far less frustrating.

3. Stolen: See Note 2… If your bike is customized, it is your responsibility to prove the value of your customization and that that your work is current. If you are unable to do so at the time of your claim, they will work off of NADA book value.

4. Please note that all BST wheels are marked with a unique serial number and mfg. date. Document your front and rear numbers for reference.

There is no need to send your wheels in for inspection unless there has been some sort of trama that the wheels were involved in, such as a crash.  We do recommend doing a visual check every so often.  Here is a link for some things to look for when doing the inspection.

BST Carbon Fiber Rear Wheel Inspection Document

Here is another link to a bunch of information on the BST wheels, frequently asked questions and things like that.

BST Wheel Load Rating Information

The hubs are attached to the carbon fiber wheel using a unique fastening system combining high strength aerospace fasteners with mechanical locking mechanisms as well as high strength aerospace adhesive.

For road use, use the same tire pressure that you usually use. For suspension – if the suspension is working OK for you before you put on the BST wheels, you should not have to make adjustments. The carbon wheels make a huge difference to the smaller bikes so there are some things you need to know. If you get chatter on fast corners once you change to the carbon wheels that were not there with metal wheels, you should be able to tune it out with suspension settings, or you could add weight to the swing-arm. The reason is simple: the total weight working on the shock is a lot less and hence you are not working within the range of the rear shock. The shock works at about 5 – 10 hertz and the wheel at +- 30 hertz so the natural frequency can chase the chatter on the smaller bikes. By putting weight on the swingarm you have the same weight working on the rear shock while gaining the advantage of the much lighter rear wheel.

We have about ten 125 Hondas that run the wheels in South Africa and they also tend to run lower tire pressures cold as the carbon does not transfer heat very well and they can get a bigger contact patch with lower pressure.

BST Carbon fiber wheels have undergone an intensive program of very stringent testing to verify their design and to confirm their strength and durability.

A designated test body in the UK performed the following tests and all tests were conducted on a single prototype wheel.

It is important to note that this ‘single wheel test’ is not usually the case when testing a metal wheel, since due to metal fatigue behavior of a single wheel would not last throughout all the tests. To allow for this weakness in metal wheels, the test regulations actually specify that one new wheel for every test is permissible, whereas in this case a single BST wheel withstood ALL tests. A sample of test results is given below, tests and forces exerted depend upon requirements of the testing body (eg TÜV) and the wheel (front or rear).

Cornering fatigue: 1,000,000 cycles at 530Nm
Radial fatigue: 3,200,000 cycles at 6082Nm
Torsional fatigue: 1,000,000 cycles at 890Nm
Impact test: 337.5kg from 150mm (JWL)

The front wheel was designed for a 150kg static load and the rear wheel for a 250kg static load (this translates into a bike with a total dry weight of up to 400kg). Modern sports bikes normally weigh between 160-220kg and race bikes rarely exceed 170kg, so these static load design parameters comfortably exceed normal conditions.

Use warm water with a mild cleaner, avoid petroleum or alcohol based products and don’t use aggressive or abrasive cleaners. A mild de-greaser will remove any oil. You can polish them with any normal polish for a painted surface. If you want to refurbish the wheels to get back the gloss and shine, then use a polish with a rubbing compound in it, and complete the process with a finishing polish.

A normal good quality shop will be able to fit the tires. Use a tire machine, and turn down the clamping force a touch. Don’t use too much mounting fluid (or soap) as this can make beading more difficult.

1. Yes.
2. Yes
3. Yes- but our Brock’s Performance stickers are on top of the clear coat… peel them off if you don’t like them. The BST stickers are under the clear and are not removable.

Please e-mail any BST related information to our direct contact address: BST@BrocksPerformance.com

We do not, sorry. But, we would recommend a precision ground, steel shim from a supply company such as McMaster-Carr.

We supply industry leading Worldwide Bearings ceramic or steel bearings with every order of BST wheels. These bearings are packed with Mobil® Polyrex® light weight aerospace grease. It is not uncommon for the bearings to squeeze out a small amount of grease during the first few hundred miles of operation. Wipe up any excess grease and once properly broken in the bearings will cease to push any grease out. If you have any further questions please contact our sales and technical staff at 937-912-0054 or sales@brocksperformance.com

Hubs can often be re-used if they have not been damaged. If the carbon fiber is damaged beyond repair, you can cut the spokes close to the hub and send the hubs to us. We will likely be able to fit them to new carbon parts, giving you new wheels at a much reduced price. Your ‘new’ wheels will carry the 2 year warranty.

If the hubs have been damaged, the wheel cannot be recovered, as the carbon parts cannot have new hubs attached to them. All repairs should be done at the BST factory.

Wheels can also be refurbished at the factory for a very reasonable fee.

Some of the properties of Carbon fiber composites as used in BST wheels:

  • Material used – Carbon fiber Prepreg in a woven and unidirectional format, embedded in a resin matrix, made from toughened epoxy.
  • Max structural temperature: 100 degrees C
  • Min structural temperature: -40 degrees C
  • Max operating temperature: 80 degrees C
  • Corrosion resistance: Totally corrosion free
  • Chemical resistance: Resistant to most dilutants such as acetone, benzene, thinners
  • Automotive fluid resistance: Limited resistance to brake fluids and acids
  • Density: Approximately 1.7 kg/qdm (Aluminum 2.7, Titanium 4.5, Steel 7.9)
  • Damage Tolerance: Similar to 2024 Aluminum
  • Strength: Better than 2024 Aluminum
  • Stiffness: Similar to 2024 Aluminum

Variable wall thicknesses can be created anywhere as needed in order to increase strength where required.
Fibers are oriented in the direction of stress in order to increase strength.
BST has a patented process for the manufacture of a monocoque (single unit) hollow spoke wheel.

What is the torque spec for sprocket bolts for a BST wheel?

Please see the BST Sprocket Installation Instructions from our Installation Instructions page: http://www.brocksperformance.com/Instructions/992014.pdf

What torque should I use when fitting the BST wheels?

Use the torque as specified for the OEM wheels. As a rule this means:

M6 bolts = 10Nm
M8 bolts = 16Nm

Make sure the bolts are free of grease or oil, and fasten them with Locktite.

The BST wheels are designed to fit the same way the OEM wheels fit. They are supplied with:

Steel bearings by World Wide Bearings, spacers and seals pre-installed
External spacers, where required
Air valves
Cush drive (rear conventional swing arm)
Sprocket carrier (rear conventional swing arm)
You will need to buy a sprocket that fits the BST sprocket carrier

Unfortunately, we’ve had to discontinue them until the price of the material becomes reasonable again, if ever.

Blackstone TEK. (“BST”) warrants each new BST carbon fiber wheel to be free from defects in material and workmanship for 2 years from date of purchase. BST’s Limited Warranty is transferable. However, any transfer of this warranty does not extend the term. A copy of the dated receipt or bill of sale from the original end user is required to determine coverage.

The R Series wheel has a modified carbon layup to provide addition strength at the spoke/rim interface as well as a robust rim flange. The carbon is considerably tougher (designed to better withstand road hazards/extreme situations/ hard-landed wheelies etc.), but it also weights a bit more as a result, 6.20 lbs. (2.81 kg) vs. 5.65 lbs. (2.56 kg) for the #161326. You will notice that the load rating is the same for both wheels 330 lbs. (150 kg) – this is because the load rating takes the strength of the hub into consideration also. Since the hubs are identical, the load rating must remain the same for both style wheels. Please see the link below for load rating safety and measurement information: Note: the R+ Series wheels are even more reinforced. Of course, they will be a bit heavier also, if identical sizes are compared.

The R Series wheel has a modified carbon layup to provide addition strength at the spoke/rim interface as well as a robust rim flange. The carbon is considerably tougher (designed to better withstand road hazards/extreme situations/ hard-landed wheelies etc.), but it also weights a bit more as a result, 6.20 lbs. (2.81 kg) vs. 5.65 lbs. (2.56 kg) for the #161326. You will notice that the load rating is the same for both wheels 330 lbs. (150 kg) – this is because the load rating takes the strength of the hub into consideration also. Since the hubs are identical, the load rating must remain the same for both style wheels. Please see the link below for load rating safety and measurement information: Note: the R+ Series wheels are even more reinforced. Of course, they will be a bit heavier also, if identical sizes are compared.

In the wet lay-up process, the fibers are positioned in the mould dry and the resin is applied with a brush. The resin is mixed by hand and mistakes can be made during mixing. This is a relatively inexpensive process, but normally the part is heavier and the fibers can distort during the lamination process meaning the process is less controlled. This method does not lend itself to the Autoclave process which cures the part under controlled heat and pressure.

In the Prepreg process used to manufacture BST wheels, the resin is applied by machine onto the fibers in a thin film. Therefore, the resin is very even and controlled. The parts are then cured under a high pressure and temperature environment (Autoclave). This results in a well-compacted laminate with better properties than with wet lay-up. Laminate properties in Prepreg Carbon fiber can be 10%- 20% better than wet lay-up at a lower weight (because less resin is used to do the same job). This Prepreg and Autoclave process is used to manufacture the exceedingly strong, but light, chassis centres (often known as ‘tubs’) for Formula 1 race cars.

Please see the BST Sprocket Installation Instructions from our Installation Instructions page: http://www.brocksperformance.com/Instructions/992014.pdf

The exact wheel weights are listed on the overview tab for each BST wheels (front is 5.5lbs./ Rear is 9.4 lbs. for the 2008 Yamaha R1).  Add the listed steel or ceramic bearing weight for a final assembled total.

You’ll gain in many ways – this is the best performance enhancing product you can buy. BSTs will make a dramatic difference that will gain you speed and responsiveness with less effort and fatigue. It’ll feel like you’ve added a few horses to your engine – but at a very reasonable price. Best BANG per $$ for performance …

Extra performance:
Low mass and lowest Moment of Inertia  results in a lower unsprung mass; this means faster cornering, later braking, improved acceleration – in all, faster lap times. Imagine the difference you’ll experience from dropping 11.2 lbs off the weight of your bike! That’s the difference in weight between the standard GSXR1000 wheels and the BSTs.

Extra Riding Fun and Rider Safety:
The huge drop in weight means that handling improves dramatically – quicker lap times with less effort and astonishing responsiveness means less fatigue.

Extra Safety:

  • Carbon fiber is a fatigue free material resulting in longer product life;
  • Carbon fiber composite is a very damage tolerant material. In the event that a wheel is damaged, the damage propagates less easily;
  • Very low corrosion susceptibility.

Extra Cool Looks:
Whether you are into performance or looks, this wheel attracts attention – gleaming, black, woven-look finish and “soft” styling makes a stunning addition to your motorcycle.

The views of UK SuperBike magazine:

what else can you do to a bike – for that money – to make it so much faster?

UK sports bike magazine, SuperBike, performed an independent two day test at the Almeria circuit in Spain using a 2002 Honda CBR900RR (954) FireBlade.

“ The first day’s testing took place with standard wheels and the only change for the second day was the substitution of BST wheels.

Weather conditions were unchanged and the following was observed:

  • Acceleration was noticeably stronger with the rider reporting “it felt as though it had gained ten horsepower 
  • The bike could be braked later
  • The bike could be turned more easily
  • Top speed at the end of the main straight was increased by 5mph
  • Lap times fell by a full 3 seconds – although the rider did report “pulling the pin out” as he felt very confident on the bike during the second day

These results are consistent with performance gains normally found by virtue of the combination of reduced unsprung weight and reduced rotational inertia provided by BST wheels. Even if a bike is not being used on a circuit, the same benefits of increased performance and rideability also apply to road/street use. “

Check out the reviews/news articles posted on our webpage: http://blog.brocksperformance.com/bst-wheel-information-page/

The BST wheels come with a 5 bolt hole sprocket carrier – the PCD of the 5 holes is 100mm and the ID is 76mm. We offer Vortex 33-51 tooth sprockets.

Use the torque as specified for the OEM wheels. As a rule this means:

M6 bolts = 10Nm

M8 bolts = 16Nm

Make sure the bolts are free of grease or oil, and fasten them with Locktite.

Load rating of BST wheels.

BST has derived our load specification from experience in the field of motorcycle physics:

The load rating printed on the wheel sticker will reflect the maximum static load/weight that is permitted on the specific wheel to not exceed the critical loads during the dynamic situation of riding the motorcycle. We design with a safety factor of approximately 4.

To check if the wheels are appropriate for your bike you can use the following rules of thumb:

Scenario 1: Motorcycle with a rider:
The usual weight distribution here is approximately 40% for the front wheel and 60% for the rear wheel.

Total Static Weight or TSW = Weight of bike with all fluids + weight of rider = 220Kg + 90Kg = 310 Kg

This leaves us with the following load ratings:
For Front wheel = 310Kg x 40% = 124Kg
For Rear wheel = 310Kg x 60% = 186Kg

Scenario 2: Motorcycle with a rider and 1 passenger:
The usual weight distribution here is approximately 37.5% for the front wheel and 62.5% for the rear wheel.

TSW = Weight of bike with all fluids + weight of rider + weight of passenger =220Kg + 90Kg + 90Kg =400 Kg

This leaves us with the following load ratings:
For Front wheel = 400Kg x 37.5% = 150Kg
For Rear wheels = 310Kg x 62.5% = 250Kg

Please go here for instructions: http://www.brocksperformance.com/brocknm/PDFS/BST_Wheel_Bearing_Replacement_Procedure.pdf

Special Note: Pay special attention to the fact that the drive adaptor bearing MUST BE SUPPORTED on the washer used to install it, as the inner spacer and brake adaptor bearing are installed. Extreme care must be taken to prevent the drive adaptor bearing from moving away from the shoulder in the wheel. Industry standard assembly techniques and tools must be used during snap-ring installation.

Brock’s Performance is an authorized BST service facility with all of the necessary tools and expertise to perform an OEM quality wheel bearing replacement.

Brock’s Performance only uses and recommends World Wide Bearings, which are installed free of charge with all BST wheel purchases through Brock’s.

The actual sprocket dimensions for BST wheels are: 5 (10mm holes) with a PCD (Pitch Circle Diameter) of 100mm and a sprocket ID of 76mm. We carry a great selection of Vortex sprockets for BST wheels,

Slight irregularities of color and small pinholes on the surface are to be expected. Most carbon fiber products are hand-crafted, and no two items will be identical. Small imperfections such as wavy weaves, small bubbles, and clear coat blemishes are inevitable. These do not affect performance.

Clutch Questions (41)

Our ultra mod and clutch cushion kit is what the Real Street guys are running. These two modifications will alow you to launch the bike harder and also gain valuable et/mph down track.

Yes. The plates look ‘different’ with smaller pads… but we have used them just the same as long as the correct number of thin and thick are used.

The exact engagement point is purely personal preference. Most riders like the clutch to engage just off of the bar enough to allow a couple of fingers under the lever to be able to hold on to the handlebars. This adjustment is ALL at the lever. The other adjustments are to give free play in the clutch pack to compensate for wear. The document below applies to all 1000’s.

No adjustment needed, make sure items that need to be removed and set aside are not being used: Loosen and remove all (6X) clutch springs/tops, pressure plate, thrust washer, needle bearing, and clutch pusher. (You will no longer use your (6X) OEM springs or spring/tops.)

Remove the nut and the four springs; the springs are no longer required. We recommend tie-wrapping the springs together in the order they were  removed for future use if needed. See Fig. 1.

Give us a call at 937-912-0054

The clutch cushion kit does place severe spring pressure on your clutch pack, which means that all of your clutch components must be in proper working order to allow smooth access to neutral. We designed our lever cam with two additional taller positions (5 and 6) to make this easier using all stock components, even after many miles of use. Most aftermarket levers do not have taller positions and will not allow the use of our lever cam, BUT in these instances, converting from the stock hydraulic clutch line to our aftermarket braided stainless clutch line will usually reduce line ‘flex’ (aka excessive line expansion due to age/oxidation/normal wear, etc…) when subjected to the additional pressure created by using the cushion kit – usually enough to allow for the use of the aftermarket levers. On Generation 1 Hayabusas, the addition of a Clutch Slave Cylinder Support is also recommended to eliminate sprocket cover flex and reduce the chance of breakage on these fragile covers.

We reuse the stock gasket 98% of the time and remove the cover multiple times per month. The stock gasket is graphite based and takes longer to remove/clean than it takes to install the clutch components.

On that bike you will actually have to put the spacer on the bottom of the spring. So it would be spacer, spring, retainer.

We recommend the clutch mod and clutch cushion kit: click here to shop.

Remove one clutch spring. Your ‘installed spring height’ is from the bottom of the pocket in the pressure plate, where the spring sits… to the top of where the spring sits. If your bike has a flat washer holding the spring – measure to the top of the post sticking up. (use the depth end of a set of dial calipers) If it has a ‘ Top Hat’ – it would be height of the post, plus the additional height of the top hat, added together. Once you have this height. Let’s say it’s 1.04 in. (ZX-14R) You simply use the Rimac spring tester to measure the spring force, at this height, for a given spring or spring/shim combination. Add shims or washers (keeping the height the same) to see how much additional pressure is gained. (multiply by 6 for total spring pressure). Ps. NEVER compress a spring to solid… it ruins them forever.

We have bikes running over 180 MPH with the cushion alone. Also, the cushion can be run in conjunction with your lock up if you have clutch slip or clutch life problem after you install the lockup. We can help you with this setup.

Clutch Cushion Kits

Thank you for your input. All of our springs are pre-set (we have specific heights, per spring) and stress relieved at the factory. The springs are designed to operate in an effective window of operation, this means that if they are compressed solid, or beyond their window of operation, they can lose their engineered tension and could become inconsistent springs. This can happen for a variety of reasons: spring weight testing, accidental coil bind ( inconsistent shim stack etc.), or accidental compression due to clutch stack height etc. You can ‘reset’ them. Simply compress all of your Brock’s springs to solid a couple of times, and they will all read the same within the allowed tolerance for that spring, typically within a couple of lbs. (- what was lost for a solid compression vs. our set compression ) One item of note: we have found that more times than not, issues like you describe are not actually our springs. Good news! Brock’s Performance springs have a lifetime warranty – simply send them in, and we will replace them at no charge. As long as they are Brock’s springs – you pay the shipping, you get free ones.

Brandi to follow up with links. 

All 99-01 Hayabusa cushion instructions are located here: http://www.brocksperformance.com/Instructions/S13-CCK1-2.htm This drawing shows the 7 thin/2 thick steels and 2 thick fibers/7 thin fibers: http://www.brocksperformance.com/Instructions/S13-CCK%201.htm These printed word instructions explain the same: http://www.brocksperformance.com/Instructions/S13-CCK%20Text2.htm Only the rounded side of the innermost plate is to be faced away from the engine.

http://www.brocksperformance.com/Instructions/S13-CCK%202.htm

Yes, we use 4 heavy duty and 2 extra heavy duty clutch springs, the springs come with this clutch cushion kit, lever pressure increased about 25%

Here are the MTC spacers that you will need, click here.

Because the static clutch pressure is so strong (550 lbs.) with our Hayabusa clutch cushion kit, you will experience increased clutch life and MPH unless something is assembled wrong or broken. Problems and cures are listed below in order of likely hood.

1. Your inner clutch hub is “notched.” The steel plates eventually damage the aluminum inner hub when launching from a dead stop on ALL motorcycles. This forms notches on the splines of the inner hub. If the inner hub is notched to the point that the steel plates can no longer slide freely, they will bind and not allow the clutch to completely compress. This is the case in 90% of premature wear situations. The cushion instructions located at the link below. FYI: we typically replace this item as many as 4 times during a typical season depending upon the power level of the bike.

2. You are not using fully synthetic motor oil- a dead stop motorcycle launch can create heat in excess of 750 degrees F. Use 100% FULLY SYNTHETIC MOTOR OIL ONLY. Few organic oils are rated for more than 240 degrees F. Cure: We suggest our Alisyn Aerospace oils and Petron oil additive, both are available in our web store.

3. Improper assembly or worn parts create a clutch creep or drag situation. If your bike tries to pull you forward with the clutch pulled in at all, the resulting heat will destroy the clutch almost instantly. (See the Clutch Creep FAQ linked below.) Cure: See 1 and 2 above. A. Inspect sprocket cover for cracks (replace or insatll the Clutch Slave Cyinder Support linked below). B. Excessive expansion in stock hydraulic clutch line. Older Busa’s develop this problem at some point. Cure: replace with aftermarket braided line.

4. Outer clutch hub backing springs are worn out. See CCK instruction link in 1 below.

5. Gearing. Excessively tall gearing can create clutch wear problems. Trying to drag race with stock gearing on most models creates excessive heat. See FAQ 319 below for gear calculations.

6. Rider style. You must let the clutch go! Some riders have a tendency to try to slip the clutch longer than required. If all is set up properly, the clutch should be completely out of your hand with the throttle locked midway through first gear or sooner. Slipping the clutch too long creates heat related failures. An indication of this problem is clutch drag in the shut down area. If you pull in on the clutch at the end of the run and it feels spongy or the engine drags, you have this problem from one of the issues above.

7. Clutch Slave Cylinder binding up. If the slave cylinder (located on the sprocket cover)is binding up, or not functioning correctly, it can prevent the clutch pack from fully compressing. Some signs that there could be a problem are: inability to install the pressure plate. Cracked pressure plate. Clutch throw-out does not start ‘creeping’ immediately after pressing it in to install the pressure plate or will not press in completely. VERY stiff clutch feel. Clutch slave cylinder problems are typically created by excessive chain lube/dirt etc. Clean/rebuild or replace unit.

Installation Instructions: 1999/2001 Hayabusa Clutch Cushion Kit

I am sorry, but those springs are not interchangeable. The blue springs for the 01-04 are much longer in length than the 05/06 yellow springs. I would check your clutch cable and make sure it’s in good working condition, because if it is going bad that could cause your issue. We have not heard reports of the blue springs that you currently have making the clutch lever feel overly stiff.

Click here to view Clutch Spring Kits

The Gen 1 ZX-14 is known for a fantastic/smooth clutch and no mod is available or needed.

Here are some items of concern:

1) Oil type. Some motor oils will cause excessive chatter – we suggest our Alisyn brand if the other items appear ok. 2) Using an aftermarket clutch pack (we only use and endorse OEM). 3) Notches on your inner clutch hub (file smooth or replace). 4) Outer basket could also be going bad/notched – see video link below (replace basket if necessary).

Use our heavy duty clutch spring kit, click here. Lever pressure is increased approximately 25%.

The Clutch Cushion gives a smoother launch from a dead stop, increases static pressure for more MPH, gives rider better feel of what bike is doing during launch, and helps extend clutch life. Cushion will not affect daily riding. We recommend a new gasket but sometimes the gasket can be reused, if not your local dealer would have one.

It sounds like your free play needs to be adjusted. Please go to the link below for more information.

Yes. What model lock-up? If it is an MTC with billet inner basket, you need our MTC kit linked below. If you have a bolt-on lock-up which uses our ultra-mod, install as instructed in our directions with alternating nut/bolt on 3 of 6 levers (lever suggestion is the same with the MTC). If you have an existing set-up which works well without the cushion….add 100-125 lbs. of static pressure with the lever configuration listed above.

Unless you have wheelie bars, you will NEVER be able to simply dump the clutch!  We suggest slightly preloading the lever before the launch and then feeding additional clutch as the throttle is screwed on at the same time.  Better riders will be able to perform this task quicker than newer riders.  The goal is to have the throttle fully pinned and the clutch completely out (without flipping over backwards!) before the 1-2 shift.  You may add additional washers to increase the static (clamp) pressure of your clutch.  More pressure can lead to quicker ET’s, more MPH and increase clutch life.  Caution should be taken to not increase the lever pressure to the point where the bike becomes more difficult to launch due to tire spin or the rider’s ability to properly control the amount of lever pressure.

You can stagger them-heavy duty, OEM, heavy duty etc. but we recommend using all 5 heavy duty clutch springs for best results.

The Petron itself will not make your clutch slip, but if it was worn out/getting ready to go – the reduced friction could allow clutch slip to show up now as opposed to later. It is important that you perform routine clutch maintenance, per the specs in your service manual, on your bike ASAP. Unfortunately, this will also require an oil change. We recommend our Alisyn Oil line and Petron Oil Additive to compliment your clutch repair.

If you change the spring pressure of the cushion you will reduce the life of your clutch – WARNING we have seen the clutch destroyed in a couple of passes with all stock springs! A new clutch cable can work wonders to reduce lever pressure.

Yes, we run the lockup and the cushion. If your clutch chatters AT ALL with the cushion…you have worn out clutch components! Please see the second paragraph of our cushion instructions linked below for a description of what to check – see video link below Outer Clutch Basket Inspection:

Call my sales staff for pricing and recommendations for your lock-up…there are different parts needed if you have an MTC inner hub etc. 937-912-0054

99-07 spring studs, ultra mod/cushion (with 02-07 conversion kit) and remaining 08 fibers and steels is how we have been doing it. You can use 99-07 steels and fibers also…but the 08 seem to hold up a little better.

There is no Cushion Kit for the 2008 GSX-R1000, only a Clutch Mod. They are different. The Mod eliminates the back torque limiter and the Cushion kits do not.

Short Answer: First, check the adjustment of you clutch switch ( if adjustable, see your service manual). Especially if you have installed aftermarket levers. The ECU monitors clutch engagement and will throw a fit if the switch is not properly adjusted, or is dirty or worn out. These switches are known to go bad also and will throw a C40 code (random!) if bad. Tip of the day: $23 at your local Suzuki dealer can prevent a world of frustration, just replace it. Here is a longer description of some of the symptoms of a bad clutch switch: Intermittently, my 2007 GSX-R1000’s high coolant temp warning comes up (red light, as well an “FI” alternating with the odo reading every two seconds) even though it’s not nearly at the temperature at which the radiator fan is programmed to kick in–221 degrees. This has happened when the temp reading on the dash was between 170 and 198 degrees. The bike doesn’t die immediately but waits until the clutch is pulled in. It starts back up and runs fine after shutting off the ignition for a couple seconds. Once it starts, it does a cute, little stutter thing at 1500 rpm. With a couple quick twists of the throttle (no more than 4000 rpm worth), it clears out and continues running normally…until the symptoms repeat themselves, usually within the next 10 minutes. In about 60 miles of riding it last night, this cycle happened at different engine and ground speeds, on the freeway and around town.

Aluminum ring and cushion ring should only be used as designed, you will need the heavy duty spring kit & lever cam.

For high horsepower applications on a Suzuki Hayabusa, we recommend our clutch cushion kit for your specific model year. This kit was developed to handle the most demanding applications and can support up to 450hp.

For high horsepower applications on a Gen 1 ZX-14 (06-11) we recommend our spring kit with .280 spacers (CLICK HERE) . This kit was developed in Rickey Gadson’s nitrous ZX-14 and can handle up to 400hp.

If your clutch lever can be adjusted so that the bike does not creep when the clutch is pulled in, you are fine and do not need our Lever Cam installed.
**CAUTION: DO NOT OPERATE A BIKE WITH CLUTCH CREEP**

 

Clutch Creep Definitions

SEVERE Clutch CreepCAN BE DANGEROUS – The bike can lunge forward (perhaps stall, or even continue on uncontrollably!) when placed into gear, even with the clutch lever pulled in completely. This is a sign of a miss-adjustment, mechanical problem, or improper installation. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO OPERATE THE MACHINE – consult your service manual or local dealership/professional for additional troubleshooting details, if needed.

If this happens with a Brock’s Performance bike, we look for:

  1. Improper cable adjustment at the lever (inspect for proper free play)
  2. Improper cable adjustment at the clutch (inspect for proper free play- ½ to 1 full turn out on screw)
  3. Hydraulic clutch bikes – not enough pressure in clutch line (make sure the slave cylinder piston was not displaced during clutch maintenance etc.)
  4. Gen 1 Busa – inspect sprocket cover for cracks. (our brace can cure this problem)
  5. Improper stack height (too tall. extra steel and/or fiber etc.)
  6. Clutch hub nut improperly tightened or has damaged/stripped threads
  7. Clutch pressure plate improperly installed
  8. Severely warped steel plates/ severely damaged clutch etc.

MILD Clutch Creep: When attempting a DRAG style launch, the clutch wants to “pull” the bike through the staging beams.

ATTENTION: this behavior should be avoided – something is WRONG – abort the run and repair the problem.

Note: If the rider ‘holds the bike back’ for even ONE PASS, the heat generated can destroy the clutch.

First, please make sure items 1-8 are 100% correct above.

Below are the most common causes of Mild Clutch Creep we encounter at Brock’s Performance, under drag race circumstances:

  1. New, freshly oiled fiber plates SWELL after oiling. A couple of quick dry hops, followed by proper adjustment before the first pass, can prevent creep after oiling.
  2. Warped steel plates (One warped plate, in the middle of your stack, can burn all of the plates from it – inward. This is because this particular plate binds and won’t let the rest of the stack compress. This is how ‘some’ of the clutch can look ok, and ‘some’ are critically burned…)
  3. Improper stack height (there is no “magic” stack height… simply follow the installation instructions in your manual along with their minimum thickness requirements. (FYI: stack height is critical for sliders/Gen 2 clutches etc. Not for general use, as long as manual minimums are followed.)
  4. Clutch spring bind (Brock’s Performance clutch springs will not bind with our cushions/spacers etc. WHEN THE INSTRUCTIONS ARE FOLLOWED. We are not responsible for other aftermarket springs, your own special configurations etc.)
  5. Clutch Cushion use without Brock’s lever cam in place (we have additional positions specifically for use with the cushion)
  6. Clutch Cushion installed on bike with ‘old’ clutch line that is worn out (expands too much)- replace clutch line with braided steel line
  7. ‘Notches’ on inner clutch hub where steel plates ride (file smooth or replace inner hub) – see note 2 above, these notches can bind up plates, and have the same effect as if a plate were warped, even if they are not… We replace inner clutch hubs 2X per season in most 100% drag applications. (When was the last time you replaced yours?…)
  8. Worn outer hub (must have at least 1 completely tight backing plate spring/ also inspect for notches where fiber plates ride and excessive play at needle bearing) – We replace these 1X per season in most 100% drag applications. (When was the last time you replaced yours?…)

See Outer Clutch Basket Inspection video link below.

The clutch cushion kit removes the chatter and grab associated with normal clutch component assembly wear caused by drag race launches. This kit produces a smooth clutch actuation and provides excellent feedback to the rider. The bike can now be launched at lower rpm’s and the clutch can be fully released sooner. The extra spring pressure gives longer clutch life, as well as quicker ET’s and higher MPH.

The Ultra Mod replaces the stock back torque limiter which is two pieces. The stock back torque limiter is what causes the jerking and chattering when launching from a dead stop. This will damage your inner clutch basket after too many hard launches. The Ultra Mod is one piece billet aluminum, it eliminates the jerking and chattering for a much smoother launch, also the Ultra Mod is much lighter than stock.

If your bike creeps at all something is WRONG! DO NOT try to operate! If you only installed an ultra-mod, it is installed incorrectly or your clutch stack height is not stock. See our instructions and your service manual to correct.

Clutch Creep Definitions

SEVERE Clutch CreepCAN BE DANGEROUS – The bike can lunge forward (perhaps stall, or even continue on uncontrollably!) when placed into gear, even with the clutch lever pulled in completely. This is a sign of a miss-adjustment, mechanical problem, or improper installation. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO OPERATE THE MACHINE – consult your service manual or local dealership/professional for additional troubleshooting details, if needed.

If this happens with a Brock’s Performance bike, we look for:

  1. Improper cable adjustment at the lever (inspect for proper free play)
  2. Improper cable adjustment at the clutch (inspect for proper free play- ½ to 1 full turn out on screw)
  3. Hydraulic clutch bikes – not enough pressure in clutch line (make sure the slave cylinder piston was not displaced during clutch maintenance etc.)
  4. Gen 1 Busa – inspect sprocket cover for cracks. (our brace can cure this problem)
  5. Improper stack height (too tall. extra steel and/or fiber etc.)
  6. Clutch hub nut improperly tightened or has damaged/stripped threads
  7. Clutch pressure plate improperly installed
  8. Severely warped steel plates/ severely damaged clutch etc.

MILD Clutch Creep: When attempting a DRAG style launch, the clutch wants to “pull” the bike through the staging beams.

ATTENTION: this behavior should be avoided – something is WRONG – abort the run and repair the problem.

Note: If the rider ‘holds the bike back’ for even ONE PASS, the heat generated can destroy the clutch.

First, please make sure items 1-8 are 100% correct above.

Below are the most common causes of Mild Clutch Creep we encounter at Brock’s Performance, under drag race circumstances:

  1. New, freshly oiled fiber plates SWELL after oiling. A couple of quick dry hops, followed by proper adjustment before the first pass, can prevent creep after oiling.
  2. Warped steel plates (One warped plate, in the middle of your stack, can burn all of the plates from it – inward. This is because this particular plate binds and won’t let the rest of the stack compress. This is how ‘some’ of the clutch can look ok, and ‘some’ are critically burned…)
  3. Improper stack height (there is no “magic” stack height… simply follow the installation instructions in your manual along with their minimum thickness requirements. (FYI: stack height is critical for sliders/Gen 2 clutches etc. Not for general use, as long as manual minimums are followed.)
  4. Clutch spring bind (Brock’s Performance clutch springs will not bind with our cushions/spacers etc. WHEN THE INSTRUCTIONS ARE FOLLOWED. We are not responsible for other aftermarket springs, your own special configurations etc.)
  5. Clutch Cushion use without Brock’s lever cam in place (we have additional positions specifically for use with the cushion)
  6. Clutch Cushion installed on bike with ‘old’ clutch line that is worn out (expands too much)- replace clutch line with braided steel line
  7. ‘Notches’ on inner clutch hub where steel plates ride (file smooth or replace inner hub) – see note 2 above, these notches can bind up plates, and have the same effect as if a plate were warped, even if they are not… We replace inner clutch hubs 2X per season in most 100% drag applications. (When was the last time you replaced yours?…)
  8. Worn outer hub (must have at least 1 completely tight backing plate spring/ also inspect for notches where fiber plates ride and excessive play at needle bearing) – We replace these 1X per season in most 100% drag applications. (When was the last time you replaced yours?…)

See Outer Clutch Basket Inspection video link below.

The Clutch Cushion kit should be assembled exactly as the instructions indicate with the correct number steel/fiber plates and our green and purple springs correctly installed as shown in the link below.

Reference: 7 thin and 2 thick steels/7 thin and 2 thick fibers all within the stock minimum thickness requirements per the service manual. Once this is accomplished the stack height DOES NOT MATTER as the static spring pressure (550 lbs.) of our kit far surpasses any variance the stack height could affect as far as clamping pressure is concerned.

Clutch Cushion and Lever Cam Installation Instructions

The Clutch Cushion kit should be assembled exactly as the instructions indicate with the correct number steel/fiber plates and our green and purple springs correctly installed as shown in the link below.

Reference: 7 thin and 2 thick steels/7 thin and 2 thick fibers all within the stock minimum thickness requirements per the service manual. Once this is accomplished the stack height DOES NOT MATTER as the static spring pressure (550 lbs.) of our kit far surpasses any variance the stack height could affect as far as clamping pressure is concerned.

Clutch Cushion and Lever Cam Installation Instructions

Clutch Creep Definitions

SEVERE Clutch CreepCAN BE DANGEROUS – The bike can lunge forward (perhaps stall, or even continue on uncontrollably!) when placed into gear, even with the clutch lever pulled in completely. This is a sign of a miss-adjustment, mechanical problem, or improper installation. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO OPERATE THE MACHINE – consult your service manual or local dealership/professional for additional troubleshooting details, if needed.

If this happens with a Brock’s Performance bike, we look for:

  1. Improper cable adjustment at the lever (inspect for proper free play)
  2. Improper cable adjustment at the clutch (inspect for proper free play- ½ to 1 full turn out on screw)
  3. Hydraulic clutch bikes – not enough pressure in clutch line (make sure the slave cylinder piston was not displaced during clutch maintenance etc.)
  4. Gen 1 Busa – inspect sprocket cover for cracks. (our brace can cure this problem)
  5. Improper stack height (too tall. extra steel and/or fiber etc.)
  6. Clutch hub nut improperly tightened or has damaged/stripped threads
  7. Clutch pressure plate improperly installed
  8. Severely warped steel plates/ severely damaged clutch etc.

MILD Clutch Creep: When attempting a DRAG style launch, the clutch wants to “pull” the bike through the staging beams.

ATTENTION: this behavior should be avoided – something is WRONG – abort the run and repair the problem.

Note: If the rider ‘holds the bike back’ for even ONE PASS, the heat generated can destroy the clutch.

First, please make sure items 1-8 are 100% correct above.

Below are the most common causes of Mild Clutch Creep we encounter at Brock’s Performance, under drag race circumstances:

  1. New, freshly oiled fiber plates SWELL after oiling. A couple of quick dry hops, followed by proper adjustment before the first pass, can prevent creep after oiling.
  2. Warped steel plates (One warped plate, in the middle of your stack, can burn all of the plates from it – inward. This is because this particular plate binds and won’t let the rest of the stack compress. This is how ‘some’ of the clutch can look ok, and ‘some’ are critically burned…)
  3. Improper stack height (there is no “magic” stack height… simply follow the installation instructions in your manual along with their minimum thickness requirements. (FYI: stack height is critical for sliders/Gen 2 clutches etc. Not for general use, as long as manual minimums are followed.)
  4. Clutch spring bind (Brock’s Performance clutch springs will not bind with our cushions/spacers etc. WHEN THE INSTRUCTIONS ARE FOLLOWED. We are not responsible for other aftermarket springs, your own special configurations etc.)
  5. Clutch Cushion use without Brock’s lever cam in place (we have additional positions specifically for use with the cushion)
  6. Clutch Cushion installed on bike with ‘old’ clutch line that is worn out (expands too much)- replace clutch line with braided steel line
  7. ‘Notches’ on inner clutch hub where steel plates ride (file smooth or replace inner hub) – see note 2 above, these notches can bind up plates, and have the same effect as if a plate were warped, even if they are not… We replace inner clutch hubs 2X per season in most 100% drag applications. (When was the last time you replaced yours?…)
  8. Worn outer hub (must have at least 1 completely tight backing plate spring/ also inspect for notches where fiber plates ride and excessive play at needle bearing) – We replace these 1X per season in most 100% drag applications. (When was the last time you replaced yours?…)

See Outer Clutch Basket Inspection video link below.

Unlike most clutch springs in the industry, Brock’s clutch springs are constructed of valve spring quality material – not the inexpensive ‘music wire’ used my most. This means Brock’s springs are rated for longer life and much higher temperatures. Here at Brock’s Performance, we frequently measure our clutch springs using a Rimac spring tester, and know that a pressure loss of less than 1-2 lbs. per spring is common over a multi-year lifetime, even when subjected to the extreme heat of drag racing and sometimes complete clutch failure. We are so confident in our clutch springs that they are backed with a lifetime guarantee. If you ever question their pressure, just give us a call and we will replace them. 937-912-0054

Yes, but you need to convert it using these instructions (see link below) – especially page 5.

Hayabusa Clutch Cushion Kit Introduction and Instructions at Brock’s Performance

Customer Service (7)

Yes we do, just remember to email a picture of your military ID to sales@brocksperformance.com and we can get you set up to receive your discount. Thank you for your service.

Brock’s Performance salutes our Armed Forces, and in appreciation of your dedicated service, will offer active and retired military personnel a 10% Discount off your order (5% Off BST Carbon Fiber Wheels.) Excludes shipping and may not be combined with other offers or discounts.

Please FAX a copy of your Military I.D. to 937-912-0062 or e-mail to Sales@BrocksPerformance.com.

Please include your contact phone number and current e-mail address.

Once you have been entered in to our system, you will begin receiving your discount.

If you placed your order in our online store, you can log into your account to view your order status.

Please email your question to sales@brocksperformance.com so my staff may help you. They will need additional information from you and also to e-mail additional international sales and wire transfer information to you.

Yes, we sell individual parts so you don’t have to buy a whole new exhaust. Individual parts are not on our website, you will have to call and we will get the order placed for you.

As a general rule, if you don’t see a particular product available in our Brock’s Performance store, it’s because we do not consider it worth selling!

We use what we sell and we sell what we use. We pay little or no attention to market trends or fancy product marketing. The bottom line is this; if Brock feels that a particular product should be used on your motorcycle to make it BETTER in any way, we try to make it available through Brocks so that we can provide the highest level of customer support possible. If a particular product is not listed in our store (example: aftermarket gauze type air cleaners for STREET use) it’s because we have found them to be no advantage compared to stock. We don’t want you to waste your money any more than you do and we certainly don’t want to direct you to purchasing a product which will slow you down.
There are some exceptions to this rule for particular use (street/drag race/land speed/road race/grudge race with large displacement engines etc.) If you have these on your list, call our technical support staff for specifics.

Of course not. The Brock’s Performance mission is to understand the constraints placed on the OEM manufacturers and eliminate and/or adjust them to allow your bike to perform its absolute best. Did you know that one trick the OEMs use to lower the noise level of a motorcycle is to dramatically reduce the ignition timing a high rev’s? When we make a statement like “aggressively modified ignition timing”, it’s because we have found out, through many hours of rigorous testing, that the bike responds positively to these adjustments. No one wants to be a slave to race gas; we just want to go ride and have our bike perform at its very best. That said, some of us like to squeeze every last bit of performance out of our machines. For these extreme users, Brock’s also provides fuel injection mapping which allows the user to switch to oxygenated race gas – for a measurable increase in horsepower and on-track performance. But this is a choice, not a requirement. Please click on the Map Support tab from our Brock’s Performance homepage for more info. on available mapping for your machine.

The Gas Factor – Fuel Options for Max HP

Exhaust Systems (80)

We usually see around 10-15 RWHP over stock with our bolt on’s, see dyno charts, videos, etc… here

Here is a list to check in order of likelihood:

1. You may have simply purchased bad fuel. The definition of bad being; a lower oxygen content (from ethanol content evaporating away etc.) or fuel with an excessive amount of water (low fuel level in the underground tank allows excessive moisture levels to be mixed from the ‘trap’ at the bottom). This can occur with no real seat-of-the-pants reduction in performance (sometimes slightly sluggish/soft performance), just an excessively rich fuel mixture. We would suggest draining or running your fuel tank down as low as possible and then purchasing from another source.

2. You may have a dirty injector (s). Dirty injectors can lead to poor spray patterns which do not atomize the fuel properly. Poor patterns may spray unburned fuel droplets in your exhaust. Our test and race information Tells you the quickest way to clean dirty injectors. An aftermarket fuel injector cleaner, such as Wynn’s Power Charge is the quickest way we have found to clean the injectors and fuel system.

3. You may need to replace your spark plugs. Today’s bikes do not require the maintenance of the older machines, so occasionally the spark plugs are forgotten. Replace your plugs.

4. Your Power Commander map may have been corrupted (from the button adjustment etc.) Resubmit a map support request form and we will send you the latest mapping to reload.

No. Brock’s Performance exhaust systems are not homologated with E-numbers for European street legality.

Note: In the United States, Brock’s Performance exhausts are considered a performance upgrade and may not be legal in some states – check with your local authorities for more information.

Please check our Terms and Conditions for more information.

Although the theory is sound, we have never actually measured a performance gain on the Dyno or the racetrack using ceramic coatings inside or outside our exhaust systems. We have seen a measurable decrease in under fairing exhaust temperatures by as much as 30% by using these coatings in some applications. Of course, black on black is very aesthetically appealing.

The stock oil pan can be used with the TiWinder, although the maximum ground clearance potential the TiWinder allows can only be realized by using our 1” deep or Pro Street aftermarket oil pans. The stock oil cooler can be retained with the use of our aftermarket line kit. All of these items can be found in our web store.

Yes, you can run without a FI control unit (Power Commander or Bazzaz), but it is not recommended. Maximum performance and drivability are achieved with a Power Commander and Brock’s matching map. All Brock’s Performance exhaust systems come with full map support at no additional charge. FYI: Your FI light will also shine if you remove the O2 sensor without using an Oxygen Sensor Eliminator Plug which is included with your Power Commander purchase or available separately at the link below.

All systems are within 1-2 HP of each other

We typically prefer ‘baffle in’ on stock motors and baffle out on built motors, but it’s really up to you in all but extreme cases. Try it both ways at the track, and see which way helps you go faster. Many people like it out at the drag strip so they can hear their own bike/shift points — over the bike in the other lane. It’s easier to anticipate your shift points by sound before you look up to view your shift light or tach, etc… There is no fear of engine damage either way if you begin with a map from the Brock’s Performance map support program. Land speed racers definitely need to start with our track maps.

Special Note: Some people believe that having the baffle in is REQUIRED with a stock engine, especially with a sidewinder. This is not the case with our patented TiWinder and our 4-2-1 sidewinder exhaust systems, although many of our competitors 4 into 1 systems have seen advantages from what we understand. All Brock’s Performance under fairing exhausts and sidewinders are 4-2-1 construction, so baffle use is really a rider/social preference.

Added note to modified engine users: In high horsepower applications (above 230 RWHP) and/or when using nitrous oxide, measureable gains can be noticed when removing the baffle if using our 4-2-1 Sidewinder or ShortMeg (above 200 RWHP). When using our patented TiWinder with the race baffle installed, minimal power losses (less than 1%) may be noticed on the dyno… even at horsepower levels approaching 280 RWHP normally aspirated. But substantial increases in speed have been recorded at the drag strip and in land speed testing as a result of reduced high speed exhaust ‘resonance’ (a phenomenon noticed at speeds above 180 MPH and most prevalent in high altitude racing, which is cured by the addition of a fiber packed/high flow baffle.)

The stock oil cooler may be retained using the stock oil cooler lines. Care must be taken to make sure the rubber section of the lines do not contact the pipe. The tubing may be bent to prevent this if needed, we also offer a 17″ steel braided oil line to replace the long oil line on the left side. Call our technical staff if you have any questions 937-912-0054

On some bikes, especially Hayabusa’s with modified engines, the air fuel signal to the pump can be lost during a Dyno run. Truthfully, we are not exactly sure why this happens, and it is very inconsistent between bikes and engine combinations. Probe length, the condition of the air fuel pump itself, and the power output of the engine all seem to be contributing factors. Nonetheless, here is what to look for: The air fuel curve looks normal at first, then suddenly shoots DEAD LEAN (typically between 5000 and 7000 RPM) and stays lean for the remainder of the run. Naturally, the operator‰Ûªs first inclination is to begin to richen the map. Because he is receiving a FALSE reading, this is the wrong direction and soon he will receive a corresponding drop in power while also witnessing the same excessively lean reading. This can become confusing and disorienting, especially to the novice tuner. The solution: Install the baffle. The increased velocity prevents the lost signal which allows a true air fuel reading. After tuning as normal, remove the baffle for a final power test. Do not worry if the A/F signal is lost again. Afterwards, we typically alter the map at the drag strip after the dyno map is created for maximum performance using a wide band 02 sensor or by making slight adjustment to the map and watching the corresponding change in MPH. This situation typically only occurs with Sidewinder exhaust, but can also occur with any megaphone base system. Note: using the O2 sensor directly in the collector of our TiWinder eliminates this issue.

Answer / Solution

Yes, just email a picture of your bike with the exhaust on it to sales@brocksperformance.com with you phone number and they will be able to get the order placed for you. They are $24.99 shipped to your door as long as you are inside the continental United States. Thank you.

Here is a link to our instruction page, if you have any questions you can also give us a call at 937-912-0054.

Install Instructions

Yes, you will have to remove the O2 sensors. If you are running the stock exhaust you don’t have to block the pair, but it will help with the decel popping if you do. We highly recommend you perform the pair valve block off if you are running one of our stainless steel systems. If you are running one of our titanium exhaust systems it is imperative that you block off the pair valve in order to prevent premature exhaust failure. Attached are the pair block off instructions.

Both, the TiWinder and Alien Head are great exhausts. Which one we would recommend is based solely on what you do with your bike. If you ride a lot on the street the TiWinder will limit right hand cornering clearance, so the Alien Head 2 would probably be the better way to go. If you are primarily drag racing, looking for optimum ground clearance and weight savings, then we would recommend the TiWinder. Either one will make great power, it is just a matter of what you are doing with the bike.

With Brock’s Performance having such strong roots in performance, we have always strived to deliver powerful light-weight exhaust systems. The stainless steel used on our systems is only .027 thick and because of how thin the material is, it must be MIG welded versus TIG welded. TIG welding.027 stainless steel is very difficult and tends to burn right through. So, although our MIG welds might not be the most aesthetically pleasing, they are the most feasible/economical way to achieve such lightweight stainless steel full exhaust systems. If you are looking for show-quality welds and the best performance possible, our CT series full titanium systems are the way to go.

The StreetSmart Owners’ Section (Private) is an area reserved for Brock’s Performance full system exhaust purchasers. Access is granted via the Map Support program and verified as a function of the New and Purchased Used Map Support Form submittal process. Once approved, password-protected admission to this area allows Brock’s exhaust owners access to instructional information directly from Brock and his staff to help guide them to a quicker, faster, smoother-running machine. This information is not for general distribution and is intended to be a performance advantage, shared among Brock’s customers. This area also contains a private StreetSmart Owners’ Talk area, which allows Brock’s customers to converse in a private forum so they can share their performance secrets.

Here is a link to our generic slip-on instructions, click here.

Please feel free to contact us directly for any specific questions that may arise. 937-912-0054

All registrations of new or used exhaust systems are handled via our map support forms.

On our home page linked below, select the appropriate form under the “Map Support” tab.

Not only does our titanium system make more power, but another performance advantage of our TiWinder versus our Sidewinder is that you can use a 1 inch oil pan. As a general rule, we calculate 1/10 of a second per inch for every inch you can lower the bike. On a seriously fast bike, it’s even more.

The more powerful your motor, the more power gain you will notice with a Sidewinder exhaust: stainless or titanium. Our TiWinder has more of an advantage in this area as well.

Estimate 7-10, check out this link When dyno’s go wrong: Caught on Tape: When Dynos Go Wrong

If it is just flattened by ¼ to 3/8 inch, there is usually no power loss. We have seen 7 hp loss from more than ½ and as much as 20 HP or more if it is REALLY SMASHED. FYI: We sell replacement primary head pipes if you accidentally smash them too much, so you don’t need to replace your entire system.

Never. We use a dual packing which doesn’t blow out.

Each Brock’s Performance exhaust is a little different, so depending on the system would depend on what things we would tell you to look at on the exhaust. We suggest making purchases direct from us, or using our dealer locator on our website and purchasing from one of our authorized dealers. You are more than welcome to submit pictures to us and we can review the exhaust as well. Below is a link to our Counterfeit Product Bulletin which supplies more information.

We do not recommend the exhaust wrap. It will help the heat problem, but can destroy your exhaust and baffle. We have a ceramic coating available to help the under fairing temps as much as 30%.

For the Brock’s Performance H2 full system with the baffle at idle, 105-106db. The Slash Cut system with no baffle is close to 6 -7db higher (112db-113db) at idle.

All bikes have some decel pop, but we send a block off cap for the PAIR going to the air box that eliminates most of the decel popping. You would hear very little if any. Please read this FAQ about the PAIR for more detailed information:

Why do I need to block my PAIR and will it affect my mapping?

The factory PAIR (Pulsed Air Intake Reed) simply injects air into the exhaust track (through a hole in the cylinder head from the exhaust port to the top of the valve cover on each cylinder) to help burn any unburned fuel in the exhaust pipe. In OEM applications, this occurs before the catalytic converter and creates additional heat to help it operate more effectively and lower emissions. In an aftermarket application the PAIR must be removed and/or blocked to prevent excessive popping during deceleration (aka Decel pop). There is no power gain to be had from blocking the PAIR alone as all aspects of the pair occur after the exhaust gases have left the engine. Additionally, fuel injection mapping has no affect on pair modifications. If the PAIR is allowed to operate in conjunction with any aftermarket exhaust system which does not utilize the catalytic converter, it can create excessive exhaust heat which may discolor exhaust pipes and lead to premature heat related failure (to the exhaust itself and especially to the packing in the baffle). Removing emissions components from any vehicle may render it illegal for street use, check with your state and local authorities.

Both of those exhausts will be excellent for a stock or built motor. The advantages of the sidewinder are; in conjunction with a low profile oil pan you can get added ground clearance to lower the bike more, also once the motor is built you have the option of removing the baffle which on built motors a lot of times will get you a few extra horsepower. The disadvantage to the sidewinder is if you do a any street riding, you will loose some right hand cornering clearance. You have to be careful when turning right. I would probably stick with the alien head if you do much street riding, or perhaps go with the short meg. The short meg doesn’t limit your right hand cornering clearance and still gives you the option to remove your baffle. Here is a link to it on our website. It is short just like the alien head, the only difference is the shape of the muffler.

All of our systems are within 2-3 HP of each other, however the Sidewinder will make more power with a built engine. Leave the baffle in for a stock engine and remove it for a built engine or with nitrous. The biggest advantage you will gain with a sidewinder over the alien head will be ground clearance and a lower bike = quicker ETs. To gain the full advantage of the sidewinder we highly recommend you add one of our low profile oil pans as well, which will allow you to lower the bike even more. As a general rule of thumb, for every inch you lower your bike, you’ll pick up one tenth in ET.

DO NOT OPERATE your bike with the Oxygen Sensor (O2) outlet open to the atmosphere. Without an O2 sensor or plug installed, fire can exit out of the O2 sensor outlet, creating a safety hazard. A replacement plug can be ordered here, or call our sales staff: 937-912-0054 ext 300 to order.

Yes! Our sidewinders will fit any 300 or 330 kit on the market. TIP: The shorty 14″ megaphone helps keep exhaust gasses off of the swingarm also.

Yes, all of our pipes will work with a 240 wide tire kit.

All of our systems that are routed under the oil pan are designed to fit around stock oil pans and will not work with a lowcut oil pan. The lowcut oil pan is designed for Sidewinders or our TiWinder systems for maximum ground clearance when lowering your bike.

We recommend about 10-15 ft-lbs to support a proper seal when tightening the header flanges. You can find this along with more information in the product installation instructions: CT Series Installation Instructions

Take a look at this link here. This link will answer all of your questions and more. It has articles, videos, dyno charts, you name it and it is all about the BMW S1000RR.

Our secure system requires proof of ownership before you may have access to Brock’s performance private forum areas or maps. If you purchased the exhaust system NEW directly from us go to the first link below for new exhaust purchase map support. If you purchased it used go to the second link below to fill out used exhaust purchase map support. Please have pictures ready of your exhaust, map support may need them for approval

Give us a call at 937-912-0054 Monday thru Friday 8-5 EST. we will get you everything you need.

A cut pan will allow more ground clearance in conjunction with our Sidewinder for quicker ET’s, but our Sidewinder can also be installed using the stock oil pan. The rear brake lever needs to be adjusted higher to allow it to work with ANY Sidewinder as they both occupy the same space when using stock foot pegs etc. Once this is done the rear brake works as designed. The oil cooler does not need to be removed and only the rear megaphone mounting bolt needs to be loosened to allow the system to rock down/forward enough to allow oil filter removal. FYI: the entire system can be removed from the bike entirely in a matter of minutes (remove 1 bolt and 4 springs-spring tool included).

The only real difference is noise…perhaps a small 1-2 HP gain. Some guys like this so they can hear their own bike along side another bike. There is a baffle out map already included in your map database.

The Alien Head and ShortMeg poduce the same power output. The sound is nearly identical for both; VERY aggressive with the baffle in place (Shortmeg is a couple of dB quieter) and the addition of the noise reduction plug doesn’t help very much since there simply isn’t much room for baffle packing.

The Alien Head shape gives a bit more cornering clearance and is hands down our best seller. The ShortMeg has that short “GP” look guys like and the easily removable baffle makes it attractive for guys at the drag strip. Baffle in performance is 100% identical, but some power gains can be noticed as engine power levels increase (both baffles are 2.25 inlet tapering to 2.0″ outlet) such as with modified engines, the addition of nitrous oxide etc.

We suggest you choose based on the above criteria, look and personal preference. When in doubt, a quick call to our sales staff 937-912-0054 or Sales@BrocksPerformance.com can usually help. They deal with these “dilemmas” many times per week.

Here is a link from our instructions on our website for baffle removal, click here.

If you have the CT-Single exhaust (that mounts at rear footpeg) you can get the QuietKore muffler and/or the noise reduction plug.

If you have the CT Meg you can get the noise reduction plug as well, but there is no QuietKore CT Meg muffler. I am sorry we don’t do trade ins, your best bet would probably be to sell it on Ebay or Craig’s List, I imagine that it would sell rather quickly. If you have any other questions just give us a call at 937-912-0054.

For some reason Kawasaki decided to use very short studs on the ZX-14R. We could suggest that you remove all of the studs and install longer ones, or supply you with long bolts to replace the studs. The problem is… This could turn into a NIGHTMARE in a hurry if you happen to strip or break one of the studs off in the process. Instead, we simply allow you to use the OEM nuts without complete thread engagement. This is not a problem, and every CT series exhaust we have sold for every ZX-14R has been assembled this way with absolutely no problems.

The street map would be best suited for your application…filter in, pump gas…but if you decide to run race gas and no filter you can change your map to the track map, which we will provide.

Although fully baffled and not ‘socially irresponsible’ like some of the open slip-ons on the market, our Alien Head is still a fairly loud exhaust. Dual stage muffler packing (stainless steel/fiberglass mix) provides an aggressive, throaty sound, yet never blows out or needs re-packing. We have many friends, family & customers (including some of us on the Brock’s Performance sales staff) running the Alien Head exhaust slip ons or systems on the street without any issues. We suggest that you check with your local authorities regarding acceptable sound levels and test criteria before purchasing.

No, it is not common for our exhausts to leak, or for you to live with a the sound of a leaking exhaust. Typically what happens in a situation of this nature is that an owner/mechanic, believing that his gaskets is leaking (for whatever reason), will over tighten the bolts holding the exhaust flanges to his engine. This can bend/bow the flange mounting plates which will actually create an exhaust leak which cannot be cured by replacing the gaskets.(See attachment)

Please see our installation instructions, click here.

Replacement flange kits and Ultra Copper sealant are available from Brock’s Performance.

Stainless Flange Overtightened Example

You’ll want the 14″ Alien Head 2 full exhaust system. To maximize the performance of the exhaust system you should also use a PCV Power Commander with our mapping.

Both systems work great on street or track, will install map in power commander before shipping, no dyno tuning needed.

The oil plug will not be an issue, the oil filter change can be made easy with our oil filter relocator, part # 250738.

They both make about the same HP on a stock engine, the question is usually Sidewinders are for race track use as they can be dangerous on the street while turning right! That’s why we created the street meg.

The ShortMeg and Alien Head are both about as loud as you can get away with on the street. The sound is nearly identical with the ShortMeg coming in as SLIGHTLY lower pitched, both offer the exact same performance. The ShortMeg does have a removable baffle, while the Alien Head baffle is fixed.

The 4-2-1 Brock’s Exhausts do limit right hand turning / cornering. Lowering the bike will limit this even more. How much will depend on your bike and riding style.

You do have to cut the plastic to install a 4-2-1 TiWinder or Sidewinder. See the instructions page for your bike.

You would not be able to install the Brock Flash 2 utilizing your stock exhaust for several reasons; the main being because the flies are being opened so much quicker than stock, the other being because we are slightly increasing your ignition timing… Both of these would require adjustments to your fuel curve to prevent an excessively lean mixture. Additionally, when raising your peak RPM limit, additional fuel adjustments would also be required, since the stock ecu is not tuned to properly adjust fueling in this area. Note: We make all fuel adjustments using a Power Commander PCV when installing our full exhaust – with or without the addition of a Brock Flashed ECU.

Yes, you risk the potential of smashing the headers on any of our pipes that go under the bike. We would recommend our Sidewinder exhaust and low profile oil pan.

If you would like the most power and drivability out of your motorcycle, then YES!

A Power Commander is mandatory if you want your motorcycle to perform at its best with your Brock’s Performance exhaust system. Your bike thinks the stock exhaust system is on it at all times, even when you change to a new pipe. The Power Commander takes the signal from the ECU and converts it through one of our custom maps to run as close to perfect as possible.

Our B-King exhaust is a full system and the cat is removed. We include a servo plate to prevent the FI light from flashing. Maps are provided via email for all our exhaust systems.

Remove the rear mounting bolt, wd-40 the connections near the oil filter and pull the entire system away from the filter. Retighten the bolt and it should stay. The system will clear (mine has 1/8 inch) with the stock oil filter….aftermarket filters?

No, we eliminate the stock O2 sensor. If you get the power commander(which is what we recommend) it will come with the jumper plug that you need to remove the O2 sensor, if you don’t get the power commander we sell the plug that you need seperately. Here is a link to that plug on our website, click here.

Yes, we sell individual parts so you don’t have to buy a whole new exhaust. Individual parts are not on our website, you will have to call and we will get the order placed for you.

The Sidewinder begins to pull away from our other exhaust systems as power level increase, with pistons, crank, cams, etc. This increase in power is even more noticeable with the baffle removed- especially with nitrous oxide use.

The 06-07 and 08-11 Kawasaki ZX-14 Slip-on systems (Alien Head/StreetMeg/ShortMeg) have different mounting positions at the stock converters and are not interchangeable between years.

Generally around 10-15 horsepower gain.

 

While the theory of hot gasses being easier to move is sound, in practice, we have not registered any gain whatsoever on the dyno or at the track. A serious problem we notice is that header wrap moves excessive heat directly to the muffler, which can cause premature failure and discoloration. Ceramic coating works much better to help control under fairing heat. That said, Brock’s Performance only applies ceramic coating in conjunction with exhausts designed to accept the additional muffler heat and will not apply ceramic to our titanium exhausts.

Attention: The addition of header wrap to any Brock’s exhaust and ceramic coating to Brock’s titanium exhaust not recommended due to creation of excessive heat/stress to the exhaust, which violates Brock’s Performance limited liability and warranty disclaimer. Please click on the terms and conditions related link below for more details.

Used exhaust system definition: An exhaust system (or complete bike) that was purchased second hand from a private individual, bike shop, E-bay, web forum, etc… Basically, by any means other than new in the box from Brock’s Performance or an authorized Brock’s Performance dealer.

Please click here to proceed to the Used Purchase Map Support Form.

Slip-on’s usually add a few HP, but are mostly used for look and sound. If you are looking for maximum performance, we would suggest a full system. Our Alien Head full system on 06-07 ZX-14’s set up right went from 169 RWHP to 188 RWHP on 89 octane pump gas.

There really isn’t much of a difference. They both use the same primaries and the same collector, just a different midpipe and muffler. It is true that some bikes like longer pipes a little better and some like shorter pipes a little better, just depends on the bike, but on a stock motor, there won’t be more than a 1-2 hp difference max either way. They both perform exceptionally well.

Having multiple pieces has several advantages:

1) It is much easier to install on the bike that way. Imagine trying to wiggle one, whole, oddly shaped piece in between the radiator and the engine and trying to get everything lined up.

2) Should your pipe ever get damaged, you can buy one or two pieces to replace the damaged area rather than having to replace the entire exhaust system.

3) Multiple pieces allow for compact shipping, which reduces costs.

4) Flexibility: We offer replacement mufflers which allow you to change your Alien Head™ into a ShortMeg™ with a removable baffle, if desired.

5) Expandability: We also offer ‘conversion kits’ which would allow you to convert your Alien Head­™ into a much quieter Gen 3 system, if desired.

Stock ZX-14 compared to a full Brock’s exhaust system you will gain around 10 to 15 hp. If you compare stock to completely “Brock,” you can gain up to around 35hp.With a slip-on system you are using the bike’s stock head pipes, where most of your power is made. Using a slip-on system you will gain very little horsepower. Below are links to our ZX-14 information page and a link to our dual system for the ZX-14. If you have anymore questions please contact us, email: sales@brocksperformance.com or by phone (937) 912-0054.

The Streetmeg muffler is 20″ long and mounts at rear foot peg, the Shortmeg is 14″ long and mounts at the front foot peg.

You did it right. We reuse the stock gaskets 95% of the time. If you can’t hear any noticeable leaks, you are good to go.

The Alien Head or the Short Meg will be the loudest pipes that we sell. They are about the same sound level. However, you can take the baffle out of the Short Meg, then it will be much louder. You cannot remove the baffle from the Alien Head.

We reuse exhaust gaskets 95% of the time for all our systems. Your local dealer can provide new ones if yours are damaged or unusable.

The factory PAIR (Pulsed Air Intake Reed) simply injects air into the exhaust track (through a hole in the cylinder head from the exhaust port to the top of the valve cover on each cylinder) to help burn any unburned fuel in the exhaust pipe. In OEM applications, this occurs before the catalytic converter and creates additional heat to help it operate more effectively and lower emissions. In an aftermarket application, the PAIR must be removed and/or blocked to prevent excessive popping during deceleration (aka Decel pop). There is no power gain to be had from blocking the PAIR alone as all aspects of the pair occur after the exhaust gases have left the engine. Additionally, fuel injection mapping has no effect on pair modifications. If the PAIR is allowed to operate in conjunction with any aftermarket exhaust system which does not utilize the catalytic converter, it can create excessive exhaust heat which may discolor exhaust pipes and lead to premature heat-related failure (to the exhaust itself and especially to the packing in the baffle). Removing emissions components from any vehicle may render it illegal for street use, check with your state and local authorities.

The addition of a Power Commander and our matching map will give you better drivability drag strip ‘launchability’ and increase power.
Power is created from the ability to burn more fuel: this is the physic’s behind the creation of additional power. The more fuel you can burn – the faster you can go.

Once you removed the stock 02 sensor, the emissions system which was causing your bike to operate in an excessively lean condition (over 16-1 air fuel ratio (AFR) vs. 13.2) at an idle and at cruising speed was removed. Our maps are tuned for 12.8 -13.6 across the board (depending upon make/mode/year), this explains your increase in low, mid range and peak power vs. stock, but it now also has your bike running at a richer overall AFR than stock, which can hurt your MPG a bit.

We now offer Street, Pump Gas Track and Track only mapping for many models. Please go to our home page, click on the map support tab and request mapping for your bike. We have updated many models and are working on updates for many more. The Street Maps have been adjusted to help increase fuel mileage and low speed drivability, while Pump Gas Track maps are designed for a steady tach needle during dead stop launches, using pump gas – of course, this requires extra fuel at low throttle openings… so fuel mileage will suffer on the street. Track Maps are for dead stop launches using highly oxygenated race fuels. You can use them with pump gas on the street also, but you may be amazed at the terrible gas mileage you register.

Please note: the stock O2 sensors are for emissions use ONLY and must be removed for proper performance. WARNING, tampering with your emissions may be illegal in your state, check your local laws. It is 100% illegal in California, please click here for more info: Competition Use Only Policy

 

Click here for PAIR Instructions

Our thin wall stainless steel is only .028 thick and it is completely normal for the header tubes to glow a dull red in low light with the bike idling. There is nothing wrong with the bike or the Brock’s Performance mapping developed for use with the pipe. During aggressive operation; such as wide open throttle on the dyno, under load from an eddy current brake, etc., the head pipes may glow red for 6-8 inches.

That being said, our exhausts come with PAIR valve (emissions) block off instructions. If the PAIR is not properly blocked, the pipes may glow red more than normal. Please go to our installation instructions page to find the instructions for your make/model/year – Click here for PAIR Instructions

Also, the bikes idle speed should be set to the manufacturer’s recommendation. Typically in the 1100 -1200 RPM range, an exceptionally high idle can cause an excessive glow.

 

The intake on the exhaust side swap would not be advised (too big) on a Gen 2 Busa (A Gen 1 intake swap will help some on a Gen 1 Busa)… but you are truly hampering your performance by keeping the stock head pipes using slip-ons. 80% of the power gains from a full exhaust system are created from the cylinder head to the muffler. That’s why you don’t even need to re-map on most bikes with slip-ons… you aren’t flowing enough additional exhaust gasses for it to make a difference. When you consider the ram air effect that the stock headpipes are choking, the performance potential loss is even greater.

Your overall performance gain by switching to our full system, especially real world MPH gains, would be much greater than from changing your exhaust cam AND it’s a complete bolt-on process. Placing the intake on the exhaust is a complicated process that can easily lead to engine damage if performed incorrectly.

No

No. It will not hurt the bike, but it will run poorly without a mapped Power Commander to make the air fuel ratio correct.

Yes, the system should fit just fine without any modifications. We have had customers with this setup before. See the attached pictures below.

Please visit the link below and it will answer your question.

Competition Use Only Policy

General Questions (107)

No, there are many things that the flash does that are not acheivable with a power commander and ignition module.

Check the small hoses on the top of the right side of the radiator. Make sure you have them correctly reinstalled, as one is the exhaust and the other is an inlet. We’ve had reports of customers installing our systems and putting the radiator back with these hoses switched and they had the exact same problem. You can read about it and other potential issues on our forum, Click here.

Also note that removing the radiator during exhaust system installation is not necessary. Installation instructions can be found in the links below.

Here is a list to check in order of likelihood:

1. You may have simply purchased bad fuel. The definition of bad being; a lower oxygen content (from ethanol content evaporating away etc.) or fuel with an excessive amount of water (low fuel level in the underground tank allows excessive moisture levels to be mixed from the ‘trap’ at the bottom). This can occur with no real seat-of-the-pants reduction in performance (sometimes slightly sluggish/soft performance), just an excessively rich fuel mixture. We would suggest draining or running your fuel tank down as low as possible and then purchasing from another source.

2. You may have a dirty injector (s). Dirty injectors can lead to poor spray patterns which do not atomize the fuel properly. Poor patterns may spray unburned fuel droplets in your exhaust. Our test and race information Tells you the quickest way to clean dirty injectors. An aftermarket fuel injector cleaner, such as Wynn’s Power Charge is the quickest way we have found to clean the injectors and fuel system.

3. You may need to replace your spark plugs. Today’s bikes do not require the maintenance of the older machines, so occasionally the spark plugs are forgotten. Replace your plugs.

4. Your Power Commander map may have been corrupted (from the button adjustment etc.) Resubmit a map support request form and we will send you the latest mapping to reload.

Because the Rotobox wheels come standard with anti-slip treatment applied to the front and rear wheels from the factory, we will quote them verbatim: Mount the tires using plenty of lubrication and inflate to 3 Bar/43 PSI – (MAX pressure 4 Bar/58 PSI), so the tire sits firmly in it’s place. The same procedure would be followed using BST wheels with anti-slip. Brock’s Performance stocks RuGlyde, an excellent tire mount lubricant – see link below.

Ru-Glyde Tire Mounting Lubricant – 8 oz Bottle
Excellent tire mounting lubricant from general street to the most powerful drag applications. Lubes then gets ‘tacky’

You must use Internet Explorer or Firefox as your web browser to view our site property, not an AOL browser or Netscape etc.

Simply put, NO. Prior approval is required if you desire to use the Brock‰Ûªs Performance logo on race suits, trailer wraps, bike paint schemes, posters, etc. to ensure brand integrity/consistency. Logo use is generally reserved for sponsored racers and events. Of course, the addtion of an approved Brock’s Performance sticker is always welcome and appreciated. If you have a question about logo use please send an email to sponsorship@brocksperformance.com

Occasionally, we find in other countries that the typical oxygenates used here in United States which promote clean air (such as Ethanol, TBA aka tert-Butyl alcohol, Hexane, MTBE, etc…) may be missing; some countries use them, some countries do not. If the oxygenates are missing, our mapping can be extremely rich for use with your fuels. This is indicated by sluggish performance, low rpm ‘surging’, a strong fuel smell from the exhaust, and/or excessive residue at the exhaust tip and/or poor dyno performance.

CAUTION: DO NOT USE BROCK’S PERFORMANCE MAPPING IN COUNTRIES WITH FUEL USING MORE THAN 10% ETHANOL – SERIOUS ENGINE DAMAGE MAY RESULT. CONSULT A PROFESSIONAL TUNER OR LOCAL DYNOJET TUNING CENTER FOR MORE INFORMATION.
This is a simple problem to correct when using the PCV with the Autotune module. Simply auto tune with a target air fuel ratio of 13.2 across the board if normally aspirated (12.0 for the Ninja H2), and allow the bike to make the appropriate adjustments. See your Autotune instructions for additional details. If your bike does not allow the use of the PCV, typically an across-the-board alteration of our mapping of -5% is enough to allow the map to function adequately. Please note: Map changes beyond this amount are not recommended.

If this does not work in your application, you will need a custom map session to match your country’s fuel to your motorcycle and new exhaust (and perhaps ECU flash), or the addition of an aftermarket A/F unit such as an Innovate unit or Daytona WEGO which will read your air fuel and allow you to alter your map through your Power Commander to make the appropriate changes. Importing canned fuel, such as VP’s MR12, MRX02 etc. will also allow you to run our exact mapping.

Also, make sure you save all of these maps to your desktop in their unaltered state as received. Rename any maps which you alter using your Autotune. This allows you to go back to your base maps at any time. If these maps become lost or corrupted, simply resubmit a previously approved form (below,) and we will resend them ASAP.

Brock’s Performance would not recommend using VP Racing Fuels MR12 as it only has a motor octane of 87. For a built motor application we recommend VP Racing Fuels MRX02, as it carries a motor octane of 98. This would be a sufficient octane for a built motor that has higher compression than stock. Brock’s Performance does not recommend the use of any oxygenated race fuels with nitrous oxide applications. For nitrous and turbo applications we recommend VP Race Fuels C16.

VP Race Fuels

Please see our installation instructions area for more information on how to perform your air box mod.

First, we recommend replacing your spark plugs and removing any aftermarket devices which could be creating ignition problems (aftermarket kill switches, air shifter, engine kills, Power Commander, etc.).

If your problem still exists: Unfortunately, about the only way for your bike to get the rev limiter before the red area on the tach is for the intake cam to be in the wrong position compared to the cam position sensor. If your engine is stock, you may have jumped cam timing? This can lead to a catastrophic engine failure. If your engine is modified, your intake cam may have been degreed higher than 107-108. The further above these numbers you rise, the sooner the false rev limiter will activate. Either of these instances should be checked out by a professional as soon as possible.

First… The bad news: Custom tuning for consumers is no longer available at Brock’s Performance.

Now for the GOOD news! — The Brock’s Performance team has developed a modern business model which allows customers from all over the world to experience the advantages of our combined tuning prowess, product selection and vast experience without the need to have the bike on premises. Do-it-yourself types can follow our easy to understand instructions or browse our video library to complete their own install, and experience the personal satisfaction of actually making their bike MUCH smoother and MUCH faster.

We are confident that we can create a combination for you that will read within 2% of our results if your bike was placed on our dyno here at Brock’s… all you need to do is follow our instructions exactly.

If you are better at riding than wrenching, use our handy Dealer Locator to find a certified Brock’s dealer near you.

Also, if you feel more confident with a custom tune, use the dealer locator link above to find this service…. Either way, Brock’s has you covered.

TREs simply lock the bike into the 5th gear map in the ECU, which affects mapping minimally.

We do not.  You can pay via PayPal or wire transfer.

If you click here,  it tells you all the information you need for international orders.

I use some handy charts to help determine your perfect ratio for the drag strip or Maxton etc.

Save the calculator for your bike on your desktop. Open the file and try changing the sprocket sizes (Secondary Reduction) in the chart to calculate speeds. It shows all gears.

We have added the proper transmission ratios and crank ratios for you!

Your tire size may differ. We paint a line on the tire with silicone, etc. then roll the bike (with the rider in place) to make marks on the floor. Measure the distance between the marks to determine circumference for your tire.

ps. Special thanks to Dave O for supplying the charts AND allowing me to post them!

We have never done tests with mixed fuel of any type. We do not do this because we want the best possible results will 100% race fuel.

f you pay with PayPal you can get 6 months to pay on $99.00 or more, here is a link from our website:

https://www.securecheckout.billmelater.com/paycapture-content/fetch?hash=AU826TU8&content=/bmlweb/ppwpsiw.html

NO! Unless you are a chemist and understand the potential problems you might be creating, you have no business mixing fuels. We do not make maps for such concoctions.

Our street maps are for consistent/proven pump gas (any octane) available from US suppliers Shell, BP, Chevron, Exxon, etc.

Our race maps are for Oxygenated race fuels. These race fuels (MR12 and MRX01) from VP Fuels produce the highest power.

Do you mix VP ultimate 4.2 for drag racing?
We have never done tests with mixed fuel of any type. We do not do this because we want the best possible results will 100% race fuel.

Is it ok to mix race gas and pump gas with Brock’s maps?
The short answer is NO.

Back in the old days, racers would mix higher octane race gas and pump gas to prevent detonation (ping) in race bikes OR because they mistakenly thought they we making their stock bikes faster. Today, we know that the only reason a higher octane ‘race’ fuel is needed would be if you have high compression pistons installed or are using a power adder such as nitrous oxide or turbo charging. Modern sportbikes are designed for a specific (readily available) octane rated pump fuel, usually to 87-91. If you decide to run a higher octane race fuel, let’s use 100 octane as an example, power levels will suffer unless the fuel has been intentionally treated with additional Oxygenates to produce more power from the fuel manufacturer. Even higher octane ratings will produce a corresponding decrease in power, we have noticed 15+ horsepower decreases in stock Hayabusa’s when using 116 octane race fuel. Mixing race fuel with pump fuel not only harms power levels, it disrupts our mapping.

Note: VP’s MR12 is the hottest oxygenated race fuel available today.

MR12™
VP’s best fuel yet for 4-stroke applications that can tolerate lower octane values, makes more power for powersport applications than any fuel on the market. Dyno tests proved up to 5% more power than VP’s MR9 and up to 6% more power than VP’s MRX01! Although currently not legal in AMA Pro Racing, MR12 passes fuel rules for AMA Pro/Am, CCS, WERA, AFM, NMA, WORCS, SCORE and Best in the Desert as well as club level racing and more.
TYPICAL VALUES
• Color: Light Green
• Motor Octane: 87
• Specific Gravity: .733 at 60°

You will notice it has an Octane rating of 87. This is the preferred fuel for use with all Brock’s Performance TRACK maps.

Sprint Filter’s polyester technology has made all of the others obsolete. We use the P08 on the street. P16 for race use and the P08-F1 for maximum performance.

No. You will need a TRE, X-TRE or ECU flash to get around the top speed limiter on your Busa. The Speedo Healer will only adjust the Speedo calibration.

On some bikes, especially Hayabusa’s with modified engines, the air fuel signal to the pump can be lost during a Dyno run. Truthfully, we are not exactly sure why this happens, and it is very inconsistent between bikes and engine combinations. Probe length, the condition of the air fuel pump itself, and the power output of the engine all seem to be contributing factors. Nonetheless, here is what to look for: The air fuel curve looks normal at first, then suddenly shoots DEAD LEAN (typically between 5000 and 7000 RPM) and stays lean for the remainder of the run. Naturally, the operator‰Ûªs first inclination is to begin to richen the map. Because he is receiving a FALSE reading, this is the wrong direction and soon he will receive a corresponding drop in power while also witnessing the same excessively lean reading. This can become confusing and disorienting, especially to the novice tuner. The solution: Install the baffle. The increased velocity prevents the lost signal which allows a true air fuel reading. After tuning as normal, remove the baffle for a final power test. Do not worry if the A/F signal is lost again. Afterwards, we typically alter the map at the drag strip after the dyno map is created for maximum performance using a wide band 02 sensor or by making slight adjustment to the map and watching the corresponding change in MPH. This situation typically only occurs with Sidewinder exhaust, but can also occur with any megaphone base system. Note: using the O2 sensor directly in the collector of our TiWinder eliminates this issue.

I have no idea of your chassis set up so I can’t answer your 60ft question….our Prostreet bike (68 in WB) gets 1.25 60’s….our super street bike(64 in WB) gets 1.38-1.38 and stock wheelbase get 1.49-1.55. The air fuel question is easy…..what ever A/F ratio you read on you quickest pass!!! All bikes are different- some like 12.8…some like 13.6 and all are usually in between. YOU have the task of changing and measuring now that you have the correct tool to measure.

Here is a link to our instruction page, if you have any questions you can also give us a call at 937-912-0054.

Install Instructions

On that bike you will actually have to put the spacer on the bottom of the spring. So it would be spacer, spring, retainer.

With Brock’s Performance having such strong roots in performance, we have always strived to deliver powerful light-weight exhaust systems. The stainless steel used on our systems is only .027 thick and because of how thin the material is, it must be MIG welded versus TIG welded. TIG welding.027 stainless steel is very difficult and tends to burn right through. So, although our MIG welds might not be the most aesthetically pleasing, they are the most feasible/economical way to achieve such lightweight stainless steel full exhaust systems. If you are looking for show-quality welds and the best performance possible, our CT series full titanium systems are the way to go.

The StreetSmart Owners’ Section (Private) is an area reserved for Brock’s Performance full system exhaust purchasers. Access is granted via the Map Support program and verified as a function of the New and Purchased Used Map Support Form submittal process. Once approved, password-protected admission to this area allows Brock’s exhaust owners access to instructional information directly from Brock and his staff to help guide them to a quicker, faster, smoother-running machine. This information is not for general distribution and is intended to be a performance advantage, shared among Brock’s customers. This area also contains a private StreetSmart Owners’ Talk area, which allows Brock’s customers to converse in a private forum so they can share their performance secrets.

Please email your question to sales@brocksperformance.com so my staff may help you. They will need additional information from you and also to e-mail additional international sales and wire transfer information to you.

Check out this previous FAQ that will help you with your issue:

My bike runs horribly, is it the map?

No… Brock’s Performance fuel injection mapping is designed to optimize acceleration and enhance drivability. Typical rear wheel horsepower gains, from a stock engine, due to mapping alone are usually in the 2-8 RWHP range – breaking down that number translates to a best case scenario gain of 2 horsepower PER CYLINDER. This is not the type of gain that determines if a bike does or doesn’t run properly. If you are in doubt, simply REMOVE THE POWER COMMANDER completely from your bike and go for a ride. Most modern day machines will run fine with only nuisance throttle irregularities, small to moderate stumbles, and a lack of smooth acceleration… but the complete lack of a Power Commander (or map) will not be the difference between the bike running very poorly and running well. So, if your bike runs VERY BADLY – It’s not the map.

We suggest the following troubleshooting tips, in order:
1. Reload the original map sent to you, or try another from the database (this will zero your unit and give you a starting point.)
2. If #1 doesn’t cure the issue, remove the Power Commander entirely. If this helps, you may have a bad unit.
Note: BAD POWER COMMANDERS are VERY RARE, but any device can go bad. Please go to www.powercommander.com for advice on repair/exchange options.
3. If #2 doesn’t work, check the bike in dealer mode to see what IT believes is wrong. Most bikes will throw codes (check FI light shines); the OEM service manual or online forums can help guide you through what these codes mean and how to display them. A u-shaped paper clip inserted into the dealer connector is all you need!
4. If #3 is not successful, try replacing your fuel; you would be amazed at how often we see bad gas these days.

5. If #4 doesn’t work, systematically remove any and all aftermarket electronic devices.
FYI: OEM electronics have less than a 1% failure rate over the life of the bike. They should be looked at as a last resort.

6. If ALL OF THE ABOVE are not successful, try replacing your spark plugs. We recommend the exact OEM replacement, but we gap at .022 as it has shown power gains on the dyno in some instances.
7. And if that doesn’t work, we suggest that you find a reputable shop or contact your dealership for more advice.

Octane increases gasoline’s resistance to ignition. Unless you are running a turbocharged or modified engine, the octane specified in your manual is usually the best for you bike.

Our friend Don Smith does a great job of clearing up what we have been trying to explain about fuel for years in an article for Throttle Nation magazine.

Please read this article (link below) and see why high octane fuel can SLOW YOU DOWN unless your engine has been modified to need it, or you are turbocharged or have nitrous oxide.

Note: Just because there is no label on the pump telling you that ethanol is in the gas doe not mean there is no ethanol. Only when the label says no ethanol may you have any possible assurance the gas is ethanol free. Ethanol actually reduces the power of the gas.

The Gas Factor by Don Smith

One of our Brock’s Performance crewmen does road race track days, drag races, and street rides daily with his 01 GSX-R1000. He has over 12K miles using less than 0 exclusively after his first oil change. We use it in all of our stock engines up to 200 RWHP. If you are worried, try the 0W-20. The only adverse affect we have ever seen with the less than zero is a bit more valve train noise since the <<0 is so thin. This is usually only an issue if the engine has a slightly loose valve to begin with, or excessive miles.

Some of our customers keep it in for around 3 months of non-stop drag racing. Just regular check and maintain, every bike and riding condition is different

We have accidentally left MR12 in the tank for as long as two weeks without any fuel pump damage or gumming of the fuel system – we could NOT say the same about MR9. Of course, this is not a good idea and one other item of consideration is that the gas tank is vented – this means that the oxygenates, which create the additional power, can evaporate quickly if left in the tank. We have seen measurable power losses if left in the tank for over two days.

Update: we intentionally left MR12 in the fuel tank of our 2017 GSX-R1000 for eight weeks, with no ill effects. Our estimate is that Euro 4 compliant machines have more robust fuel system components. Of course, this is not recommended.

It depends on the bike and where you set the links, but generally about 1-3 inches. It is a good idea to get a shortened or adjustable kickstand, especially if you are going to be running the bike with the links on the lowest setting, as the stock height kickstand will most likely not work at the lowest setting.

30-50 shot

At least 1/4 tank to prevent “slosh” on the launch. The MR12 is fine all weekend in the tank. At the end of the weekend, drain it and fill with pump gas to COMPLETELY submerge the pump. Every so often we highly recommend to run a can of Wynn’s Power Charge through your bike to thoroughly clean the injectors/fuel system.

We use Petron with every oil change in the bikes that are trying to achieve their best times or produce max power on the dyno. It treats the metal, that’s the insurance part of the product, in case the pick-up is ever starved for oil (wheelie/super hard launch or decel at the end of a run etc.) But, it can’t reduce the coefficient of friction, to make more power/increase acceleration etc. when mixed with the oil, if it isn’t IN the oil. Visit our website to read more information on the Petron Oil Additive.

Yes, lowering the bike will lower your ETs. The lower the center of gravity, the harder you can launch. Below are links to front end lowering and lowering links.

Related Products

Run as much pressure as you can get away with for your application/track conditions. FYI: we don’t ever go lower than 10 psi on any tire…it’s not safe.

Both of those exhausts will be excellent for a stock or built motor. The advantages of the sidewinder are; in conjunction with a low profile oil pan you can get added ground clearance to lower the bike more, also once the motor is built you have the option of removing the baffle which on built motors a lot of times will get you a few extra horsepower. The disadvantage to the sidewinder is if you do a any street riding, you will loose some right hand cornering clearance. You have to be careful when turning right. I would probably stick with the alien head if you do much street riding, or perhaps go with the short meg. The short meg doesn’t limit your right hand cornering clearance and still gives you the option to remove your baffle. Here is a link to it on our website. It is short just like the alien head, the only difference is the shape of the muffler.

We have had this service performed in the past, the problem is, you can’t just “re-valve” the shock. The piston must also be changed along with the re-valve and this can be very expensive. It is far more efficient to invest in one of our DragShock EZs versus going through the time and money needed to convert that shock.

That has nothing to do with the map….Your kill time is too long. Adjust it quicker so that the pipe does not load up with as much fuel.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Your stock ECU contains mapping to match the stock combination. If you do anything to increase intake or exhaust flow, you will need mapping to obtain the proper air fuel ratio. Does this mean that your bike will not run without one? No, but it will accelerate much harder with one. Your stock ECU is not self mapping (new bikes with O2 sensors are for emissions only and must be removed for proper race performance).

When you start talking about built motors there is an endless combination of ways that they can be built. The best thing to do would be to talk to the person that built your motor and see what they recommend.

Yes, our exhaust systems will increase performance over stock, especially when you modify the engine.

Safety is our utmost concern. As a general rule  1.5 times the diameter of the bolt, of thread engagement, is optimum.  Example: if the bolt is 10mm in diameter, 15mm of thread engagement would provide the maximum hold.

Yes, all of our pipes will work with a 240 wide tire kit.

We see no improvements at all on any Suzuki’s with the ignition module.

Our full systems are within 1-2 HP of each other, choose a system that you like the looks of best.

There is no magic shift rpm for any bike/rider…there are too many variables; rider tuck position and shift ability (quickness/style etc.) is huge. If I tell you XX, XXX…you might hit the limiter, or you might get to it so quickly that you are leaving wasted HP on the table after the shift. Remember the available power AFTER the shift is as important (sometimes more!) as the peak shift point.

Example: Go to the drag strip and shift at redline on the tach, you probably just reached peak power and then shifted out of it. After the shift you may have dropped to an area of your power curve which is 10-15 HP lower than peak power. Next, add 400 RPM above redline (if your limiter allows this, typically most bikes will run 200-600 RPM higher than red line without hitting the limiter) You stayed in a peak power area for a longer period of time AND you had 8-10 more HP available AFTER the rev’s dropped, since the bike did not drop as low in the power curve as it did during a shorter shift. This higher average power makes it easier for the bike to accelerate which leads to quicker E.T.’s and higher MPH.

All of our exhaust systems (for all bikes), are designed to produce peak power in the high rev’s without harming acceleration in the low rev’s. We see very little “nose over” on our dyno runs on any late model engines…even if there is a slight drop, this is without ram air. During a real world run the ram air reduces or eliminates this. Don’t be afraid to touch the limiter during your testing at the strip, it’s the only way you are going to know where the best shift point is for you.

Since this is a Guhl flash you will have to talk to Guhl directly to see what combination that you should run and whether you need it tuned or not. We have no way of knowing what he did when he flashed your ECU.

Unfortunately, the PC2 is obsolete. You will need a cable and the correct software. You will need to contact Dynojet as we do not stock or support these items any longer.  The PCV is the current Power Commander model.

While velocity stack lengths can effectively ‘move’ power and/or torque up or down in the rev range, they have surprisingly little affect on the air/fuel ratio while doing it. As a result, special mapping for use with specific velocity stack lengths is not required. Brock’s Performance does suggest specific OEM stack ‘swapping’ on certain makes/models in some circumstances. Example: Gen 2 Busa using shorter GSX-R1000 stacks, or highly modified Gen 1 Busa’s using all short stacks etc., as explained in our private owner’s group information… even then, the standard stack configuration can also be used with the same maps.

No problem on the 93 map. All of our street maps are suitable for 87-93 octane without additional changes. We suggest 87 octane as a way to keep you bike running faster at the drag strip than with 93. There is a 1-4 HP decrease in power using 93 vs. 87 which typically cannot be noticed by ‘seat of the pants’ general riding, but our racers don’t like going slower at all. In some situations additional octane is necessary (hot climate-dual passenger riding etc.). Just like you would not need to remap your stock bike to compensate for any difference in octane levels, you do not need to worry about it with our mapping or suggested combination either.

Related: Does Brock’s recommend the use of K&N or BMC aftermarket street or race air filters?
Brock’s Performance does not currently recommend or endorse the use of ANY BRAND aftermarket “street” filters. It has been our experience that they do not perform as well as stock and can actually work much worse. The reduced air flow compared to stock; disrupts our known good mapping, decreases fuel mileage, hampers driveability, significantly reduces power levels, fouls plugs, creates excessive soot at the exhaust tip, generates excessive carbon deposits in the intake track etc. When over-oiled we have seen these problems increase dramatically with registered horsepower losses in the vicinity of 10-15+ with greatly increased fuel consumption. You can’t go wrong with today’s modern OEM air filters, in regard to engine life and consistent performance.

We have noticed measurable performance gains when using both K&N and BMC aftermarket “race” filters compared to stock, but these filters are for racetrack or low mileage use only since they basically filter out bugs and birds!

Registered Brocks Performance exhaust system owners can read additional test details in our private owner section linked below (see note 18): http://www.brocksperformance.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=13

If you are looking for the type of gains noticed from re-flashing a severely neutered bike, such as the 2011 ZX-10R… The answer is no. If you are looking for large horsepower gains on the Dyno, the answer is still no, because the power of your Gen 1 ZX-14 begins to flatten out before you hit the rev limiter in its current form. Where gains can be noticed are in the over-rev. Because your bike currently doesn’t ‘nose over’ before it reaches the factory high limit, an additional 400 RPM or so can be beneficial. At the drag strip this can allow you to shift your bike at a higher RPM, which means that the next gear begins in an area of the curve which can be as much as 8 to 10 hp greater versus the OEM ecu. We have measured gains as much as half a 10th in the quarter-mile, even though no Dyno improvements were noted. Additionally, this can also allow the use of one tooth larger on the rear sprocket (for a harder launch), in some instances, without the need to shift into a higher gear before the finish line, leading to quicker ET’s and higher trap speeds. This increase in RPM can also be very important in land speed racing.

In conclusion, many of the restrictions placed on the GEN 1 ZX-14 can be offset by removing the secondary butterflies. Installing a Speedo healer can offset the top speed restriction, but this is nothing more than an irritating Band-Aid. There is no ‘plug-in’ means to increase the RPM limit, so the advantage of a re-flash certainly has its merits, even if a stunning horsepower gain on the Dyno isn’t one of them.

There is no actual answer to that question except for as much pressure as you can to prevent the chain from jumping the sprockets, but not too tight as to wear out the guides. (There is no xx ft-lbs. etc.)

Here are the instructions from an actual race manual from Suzuki Japan:

Camshaft Chain Tensioner
○ Replace the cam chain tensioner with the kit tensioner to decrease the flutter of tensioner.
○ Apply the engine oil to the tensioner rod, O-ring and tensioner body, insert them into the
tensioner body. (Our Brock’s Performance tensioner is pre-lubed)
○ Check to see that the tensioner rod turns freely in the body.
○ Install the tensioner on the cylinder block with the tensioner rod is fully pushed back.
○ Turn the tensioner rod in with a screwdriver until it becomes hard to turn.
○ Turn the crankshaft clockwise forcing lightly to the tensioner rod with twisting force to
take up any gap and tighten the locknut.

NOTICE
Never forward the tensioner rod forcibly, this will increase mechanical loss of the
tensioner and may damage to the chain guide. The cam chain tensioner must be adjusted at every race , when road racing.

For drag racing, we check it frequently @ every 10 passes, by rotating the engine by hand forward and back to feel for exesive movement. Minimal ‘slack’ may be felt, but excessive slack can cause the chain to jump timing and lead to engine failure.

In the megaphone, about 5 inches back from the small end.

You must not only drain the MR9/MR12/MRX02 out of the tank after every use, but you must also run the engine with pump gas to prevent the results shown in your photo’s.

Here’s the short answer: Density Altitude(Da) are the conditions relevant to International Standard Atmosphere(ISA), sea level (0 ft. (0km)) altitude, 59 degrees F (+15c), and pressure altitude of 1013.25 mbar (or barometer of 29.92 inHg). See the links below. As a rule of thumb from a racing standpoint: For every 1000 ft. the Da goes up, a normally aspirated bike will typically slow down almost a tenth (actually right around eight hundredths or so = .08) in the 1/4 mile. So, for the sake of this discussion, as the Da goes up, it’s similar to traveling to a track that is at a higher elevation, and everyone knows that high altitude tracks are slower – right? Our local track for Brock’s Performance, Kil-Kare Dragway in Xenia, OH, has an actual elevation of 803.6 ft. above sea level. When you consider the temperature and barometric pressure (+ various other factors – see links below,) in the springtime, we typically register a Da around 2000-2500 ft. In the summer we reach over 3500 ft. Da (hot/humid, etc…) which means that we slow down at least a tenth in the summer vs. spring. Putting it simply, there is nothing that can be done about this loss. Some additional tuning, a slightly leaner fuel mixture, and perhaps a bit more ignition timing to help burn the additional water vapor in the humid summer air, can sometimes help the losses from being even WORSE. But the air is simply less dense – or less filled with oxygen + it’s filled with more water (that doesn’t burn), from the humidity, so normally aspirated bikes must just live with going slower. Nitrous bikes can add more nitrous, turbo bikes can add more boost – this conversation is related to normally aspirated machines. FYI: a tenth (.10) of a second loss in E.T. in the quarter mile equates to about an 8-12 RWHP reduction in power for a modern 180-200 HP sportbike. Of course, if the Da goes down, the bike will get quicker, using the 1000′ = (.08 -.10) or so formula above. These numbers are general, and they will vary depending upon how quick the bike is in the 1/4 mile. Less powerful bikes tend to slow down more, etc. so do bikes that run standard pump gas vs. oxygenated race fuel. Your results may vary, but you will slow down as the Da goes up. 1/8 mile racers slow down also, just not as much. Fun Fact: Both Gainesville Raceway in FL and Valdosta’s South Georgia Motorsports Park elevations are around 200 ft (137.8 ft. and 229.7 ft. respectively) above sea level, with their typical Da registering around 1000-1200 ft. so we pick up about a tenth, just by putting the bikes in the trailer and making the drive. Atco Raceway in Atco, New Jersey is also a favorite destination with an actual track elevation of 93 ft. above sea level. Check the link below to view the Kestrel meter we use to monitor Da at the race track.

Related Information:

We use the <<0 in our S1000RR’s which rev to an honest 13.8k on the dyno and less than zero Alisyn has been used in Indy cars which rev to 18K! It does not foam or break down at high revs.

The Petron itself will not make your clutch slip, but if it was worn out/getting ready to go – the reduced friction could allow clutch slip to show up now as opposed to later. It is important that you perform routine clutch maintenance, per the specs in your service manual, on your bike ASAP. Unfortunately, this will also require an oil change. We recommend our Alisyn Oil line and Petron Oil Additive to compliment your clutch repair.

We drag race and street ride with our less than zero oil and Petron oil additive with no problem, if you are in a very hot climate the 0W20 works great also.

We would suggest our Alisyn fully synthetic oil in the weight which the factory recommends‰Û_perhaps one weight lighter if you desire maximum performance on the drag strip.

An inch or so lower still allows the bike to handle better than 90% of riders abilities!  We suggest our billet top clamp (or sliding your forks in the OEM clamps) and adjustable dog bones on position#2.   An adjustable kickstand is a good idea also.

We have re-flashed many European ECUs and it has not affected the antitheft coding between the ECU and the key.

Both systems make great power. The CT series are a work of art, the craftsmanship, fit, finish, and function are top notch. The Alien Head is ultra light stainless that comes in natural finish or black ceramic coated, has the short look and aggressive sound.

We supply industry leading Worldwide Bearings ceramic or steel bearings with every order of BST wheels. These bearings are packed with Mobil® Polyrex® light weight aerospace grease. It is not uncommon for the bearings to squeeze out a small amount of grease during the first few hundred miles of operation. Wipe up any excess grease and once properly broken in the bearings will cease to push any grease out. If you have any further questions please contact our sales and technical staff at 937-912-0054 or sales@brocksperformance.com